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Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
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Bailing wire, fishing line, hair clips, hot wax gun (basically a hot glue gun modified) there’s a couple of ways out there, but the best and fastest is still the rubber band. Just saying 🤠
 

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Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
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There are two types of glue guns out there, a high heat, and a low heat these are primarily used for candle making, however you can filter wax, make sticks, and use them to attach comb at different spots on your frame. The bees do the rest, kind of like tac welding with bee wax. (Edited) Oh and most importantly, use the low heat gun for this. You use a high heat and things tend to go wrong with bee’s wax.
 

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I wire my foundationless frames so if the comb is not full of honey I can just press it into the wires.
I use the flat of my hand on the comb side and then use my hive tool to press the wire into the midrib. Now that I think of it I also press the comb into the top bar a bit as well.
 

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I've always used cotton string. Make slip knot in one end, put on one "ear" of the top bar, and wind it barber pole style around the frame to the other side and tie off at the other "Ear" of the top bar.
 

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you could also try using melted was to cement the comb to the Frame. There is a tool to do this, but I can not remember the name. The tool is a tube, that is mostly closed at one end, and closed at the other end except a small hole. You put the tool in a container of melted wax, and let it fill up. You then cover the hole in the top with a finger and slowly let air in to drip wax onto stuff (in this case the comb and frame)
 

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Possum Valley, TN Bee Wrangler
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What is wrong with rubber bands??

Number 33 for deep frames works like a charm, not too tight to distort the frame or too loose to let the comb fall out. Thin enough for the bees to chew in half and drag out in about 5 days.

There are what is called cut out frames. They are cut in half, hinged on the bottom bar and have chicken wire on both sides. Open the frame like a book, drop your cut out comb in and close the book.
I can't locate a pic of them to show you:(
 

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I used cotton thread on my first deep hive body. When I went to transition it off of the swarm trap to a bottom board, there was thread hanging down everywhere. They must not have liked the color.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I like the string idea. The issue with rubber bands is the cut outs aren’t completely flat. I tried to leave enough room but the ladies glued parts of it together. As I tried to rearrange the frames to create more space between them they would pull the rubber bands and shift. I had to stop or I would pull the section out of the frame.
 

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I came across this earlier this evening, and thought of this thread ....

For securing broken combs, or in transferring - strings, fine wire, wooden slats, etc., are usually recommended. These have to be tied, twisted or nealed, as the case demands, and are awkward. A little "kink" in regular use in Mr. Poppleton's apiaries, we consider quite noteworthy: A box in the tent, or honey house, always contains a good supply of wire clamps; which are simply a piece of stout wire cut one inch longer than the frame in use. A half-inch at each end is bent at a right-angle. These slip firmly over the frame, and readily support any part of a comb that may need holding in position. They are instantly adjusted, always at hand, simple, inexpensive, and a great convenience.

From "The American Beekeeper", 1902


Sounds good to me,
LJ
 

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simply a piece of stout wire cut one inch longer than the frame in use. A half-inch at each end is bent at a right-angle. These slip firmly over the frame, and readily support any part of a comb that may need holding in position. They are instantly adjusted, always at hand, simple, inexpensive, and a great convenience.
A great idea.
Pre-cut/pre-shape once.
Have a batch handy.
Snap onto the frame and make sort of a "cage" to hold anything within the frame.
Snap off when done.
Reuse.
 

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Possum Valley, TN Bee Wrangler
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I have tried almost everything and still hard to beat rubber bands.
 

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I've used rubber bands once, but they stretched and lost strength with the heat within the hive. I stick to cotton string myself, but everyone is different, I think it comes down to ease and convenience as well as performance. Both do seem to work at least well enough, and don't require much if any design or construction of another tool or piece of equipment.
 

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Just wanted to add that with any of the 'soft' materials which are recommended for this purpose, I've found that they all require a person to have at least four hands and preferably be an expert juggler ...

One method I've considered carefully, but never actually used yet, is to press several (say, 6) drawing-pins - 'thumb-tacks' in the US - into the side of each frame side-bar. Then, connect these by winding cotton thread or fishing line back and forth across the frame, but only on one side of it. Then, lay that frame down onto a flat surface and place the various comb segments in place. Then, and only then, repeat the thread winding back and forth as before, only this time across what is now the upper surface.

I reckon that would be very do-able for those beekeepers only possessing the normal complement of two hands ... :)
LJ
 

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Well I just happen to have four hands, Bizzy Bee (my lovely wife) is the biggest help when it comes to cut outs.
 

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30 lb fishing line and poster tacks works for me. I use Layens hives and always splice in comb from the bottom of an empty frame. Amazing how fast they build comb up the sides to the top. No summer comb falling.
 
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