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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)








































From left to right: shielded; bare natural-wood finish; Colony Quilt; Bee Cozy

 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
From left to right: shielded; bare natural-wood finish; Colony Quilt; Bee Cozy

From top to bottom:
Wall[SUB]o[/SUB] = outside wall temp;
Wall[SUB]i[/SUB] = inside wall temp;
Inter. = interior air temp.


2/27/2014, 0600h - about 45 minutes before sunrise. Ambient air temp 24.5F.




2/27/2014, 1700h - at the end of a partially cloudy day. Ambient air temp 54.4F.




2/27/2014, 1000h - about 2-1/2 hours after sunset. Ambient air temp 45.6

 

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Now that is my kind of test:thumbsup:

Though the results are difficult to sort through.
 

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I'm reading it as neglible difference, or am I missing something?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
bluegrass - edited to add ambient air info.

Ambient air temp was a few degrees less than the interior air temp of the shielded hive in the second data photo of post #2 because the day was just starting to cool off and the mass of the shielded hive was holding a little bit of warmth. The morning photo shows that at thermal equilibrium, the shielded hive interior is practically the same as ambient air. At least, that is my interpretation of the data shown so far.
 

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did you calibrate the thermometers off of each other? There could be that much variable just in the temp sensors. I have an indoor weather station that is off by 14 degrees compared to what the local weather beacon reads.
 

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I'm reading the Colony Quilt warmed up in the sun more than the Shielded. Nice Work!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
bluegrass - the maximum spread between the thermometers is about 2.5F. Note how close they read to one another just before sunrise when temps have equalized between all the hives.
 

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I'm reading the Colony Quilt warmed up in the sun more than the Shielded. Nice Work!
Keeping in mind that if a cluster was in side a hive that keeps the sun out, it will also keep the warmth from the cluster in.
 

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I'm reading the Colony Quilt warmed up in the sun more than the Shielded. Nice Work!
Well thats to be expected. The shield is reflective, its actively bouncing warm sunlight away from the hive.

So from what I'm seeing, the colony quilt was the only thing that made any real difference at all.

Makes sense, the bee cozy appears to be stuffed, which means it is insulating the hive from the warming sun as well.

Honestly I'd think at this point you could probably get very similar results to the quilt by simply taping black construction paper to the sides of the hives.
 

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The type of sensor used in those little digital thermometers is usually remarkably accurate. Scale factor from unit to unit is nearly identical, so they only have to tweak the zero offset. For consistency, it is a good idea to check them in an ice water bath (50/50 ice and water is 32.0 F).

Me, I'd have thrown the $2700 data acquisition system at it, but I'd have to tear into it and add thermocouple connectors to hook that many channels up. Besides, its in the garage right now testing an electronic hive scale.

One look at the setup above, and I know Shinbone is serious!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
One look at the setup above, and I know Shinbone is serious!
That is high praise, considering the source, Phoebee!

I added a third data photo to post #2.

Once I confirm my suspicions that the shielded hive will pretty much track the ambient air temp, I will remove the shielding and wrap it in roofing paper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
bluegrass - I think the roofing paper I have on hand is 15#. Is one preferable over the other for testing?
 

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Tests like this takes time (and money). Thanks for taking the time shinbone. The results are pretty black and white.
I am so looking forward to the tar paper test. 15# is preferred. Just make sure it is wrapped tight so it is in contact with the hive as much as possible. Be ready to be amazed at the results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Glad to provide some info to folks.

I already know what to expect with roofing paper based on how the Colony Quilt and Bee Cozy have performed. From the CQ and the BC:

The more insulation the black wrapping has, the smaller the temp spike caused by the Sun's heating, and the slower the change of internal temp in the hive, in other words smaller but more gradually changing temps going up and coming down.

The less insulation the black wrapping has, the higher the temp spike caused by the Sun's heating, and the faster the temp changes as the sun cycles through the day and night.

Regardless of the amount of insulation, the hive will cool down to ambient sometime before sunrise (just looking at solar gain without any bees' heat to contribute to hive temp, which previous tests have shown can be substantial http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?291469-Winter-time-fun&highlight=winter+time+fun ).

Consequently, of the black wraps, roofing paper will show the highest temp spikes and the fastest temp changes, dropping down to ambient the fastest once the sun goes down.

JMHO
 

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Thanks for going to the trouble of doing this!

Be sure to add some good Tags so the tread can be found more easily...
 

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"Consequently, of the black wraps, roofing paper will show the highest temp spikes and the fastest temp changes, dropping down to ambient the fastest once the sun goes down."

True for an empty hive. Mass (bees, honey, frames, wax, etc.) will act as a heat sink and absorb the heat throughout the day and throw off heat during the dark hours.
Thanks again for the tests.
 
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