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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 5 mile electric fence controller made by Zareba model EDC5M-Z that requires a 12 volt battery. I have a deep cycle battery and a coleman solar panel with the 7 watt interface. I was told that you shouldn't use them with this controller but not sure why. The controller should be protected from overcharging etc. by the interface so has anyone used it with this setup? the instructions on it just says to disconnect when charging. Curious to know. Thanks in advance, Jack
 

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The applied voltage while charging is higher than the batteries normal output voltage. The Zarebas insulation is probably marginally capable of preventing short circuiting or grounding out when they are new and after they absorb a bit of moisture they give up.

I had one fail with just the setup you are describing. It was really hot (till it was not!) Afterward the jolt was barely perceptible. Tractor Supply stores handle them here in Canada. My son had a bunch of failures with them and not longer bothers buying them.

We both use Parmak Magnum brand now and leave the solar panels with charge controller connected all the time. No problem with them.
 

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That explains it then. I wonder if there is some kind of regulator you could buy or resister pack to pad the voltage going into the unit. I am going to measure the voltage out of the battery as well as the solar panel regulator and see what the difference is. Thanks for the information Frank.
 

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Yes, that might do the trick. It is not really easy to sense all the implications of measured open circuit voltages. It is necessary to put a load on a battery otherwise you measure surface charge. Similarly voltage from a transformer charger or a switched charge controller that may have voltage peaks higher than the nominal voltage.

Fence chargers may "see" the peaks and its power capacitor may charge to a higher than design voltage especially if the fence is "clean" and well insulated. If the fencer power supply was clean ripple free power such as from a battery this would not happen. A simple Volt Ohmmeter measurement will not show you what the peak ripple voltage is. That would take something along the lines of an oscilloscope.

A more sophisticated fencer probably would have provisions to protect itself from this and a high quality battery charger will probably have some ripple voltage filtering.

You might get away with it but there is probably a reason behind the warning supplied with the fencer. My fencer stood up for a month or so but I suspect after their insulation absorbs a bit of atmospheric moisture they can give up the ghost.
 

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Hi mate! I had similar troubles, however I do not really know how to fix the problem. In this order, I asked one of my friends for help.
 

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I use to hear stories about a great uncle who cut an extension cord into. He tied the hot to the fence, and connected the neutral to a light bulb on the wall in the kitchen which was then tied to ground. When the light flashed you knew something had tangled with the wire. I am NOT recommending you replicate. You have to remember this guy supposely neutered his own cats by hand and what such also.
 
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