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i am looking for a good soap recipe containing honey or beeswax or both, does anybody have good ones that work?
 

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I add 2 tbsp of honey per one lb of melt & pour soaps with fragrance I also add 2 tbsp of my own melted bees wax to the soap. I melt the beeswax in the microwave (be careful not to burn it, as it can catch on fire :eek:
I sent an email to a friend of mine that does cp soaps and adds my honey to it when she responds I will send it to you. I am also going to increase the honey to the MP soap slowly to see how far I can push the envelope before it breaks :)

Eileen
 

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You can add honey and/or beeswax to most any soap recipe. The honey is added at trace and one recipe I have I add 3.7 oz honey to 91oz of base oils. Part of the base oils in that same recipe is beeswax at 3.7 oz also, which is about 4%. Honey tends to knock down lather which can be countered with castor oil, but as both increase the soap gets softer. The softness can be countered with beeswax but this too tends to knock down lather. Make sure when you change something that you run it thru one of the online lye calculators.
I lately read on a soap forum where adding sugar to the lye/water will increase lather. I asked if honey would do the same and got a yes. So I took a recipe I've been using for years and did four small batches, tweaking each one slightly, two with extra honey in the lye/water, two without. In another couple weeks we'll start testing :D.
 

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Every hobby has endless levels of craftsmanship. Read to the level of your interest and then make soap based on your level of satisfaction. Every oil you use has a mix of neutral fats and each will impart a characteristic to the resulting soap. There is an INS value derived from titratable iodine that is an indication of the level of saturation and a SAP value based on the concentration of soponifiable esters. Some oils dry the skin and some are humectant. Some oils penetrate the skin and are called noncomedogenic. Some fats make a great lather while others add to hardness of the bar.
Like most hobbies there doesn't seem to be an end. Do you follow recipes in the kitchen or do you prefer to understand what each ingredient does so you can cook up something different each time?
 
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