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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone else ever make a snap decision in the apiary then spend the rest of the day brooding about it wondering if it was the right thing to do, or if you only made things worse. I suppose with more experience these decisions will come easier, but in the first few years it is hard to know if you are doing the right thing.
 

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Does anyone else ever make a snap decision in the apiary then spend the rest of the day brooding about it wondering if it was the right thing to do, or if you only made things worse. I suppose with more experience these decisions will come easier, but in the first few years it is hard to know if you are doing the right thing.
I make snap decisions almost every time I am in the Apiary.
the Brooding, I leave to the Bees.

I agree is is hard to know if you are doing the right thing.
Remember doing nothing is not a bad plan, bees will tend to sort out most things.
If with the data at hand you decide to do something, be happy with it.

Do or don't do, but be happy

GG
 

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May sound strange, but whenever one of those questions pop up, ask yourself the posed question out loud. And then answer out loud. It tends to make you first think about all of the variables, and you “know” that answer is the right one. No more second-guessing.
 

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Does anyone else ever make a snap decision in the apiary........
All the time.
This is why my bee-van has everything in it that I might ever need at all times.

Pretty much - veni, vidi, vici.

To be sure - "do nothing" is a totally valid and good option.
 

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Doing nothing is often the hardest decision to make. Its often our nature to feel like we need to do something. Which is what usually causes the issue we create for ourselves.
 

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I used to question myself a lot when if first started beekeeping. Now I make a decision get the job done and walk away.
Despite the stupid decisions and mistakes I have made over the years bees have done very well.
 

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I have found that the more apiary snap decisions I make (and deal with the consequences of them!) my snap decision making gets better! I can always get more bees.
 

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All the time... and learn some very good lesstions lol

but with the exception of swarm cells and the queen is still in the hive, there is very little that you can't do tomorrow after you sleep on it and do some research.
 

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Absolutely necessary to act, reflect, analyze, and evaluate to learn the craft of beekeeping. With enough experience you will begin to apply the right remedy to meet almost any encounter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
All the time... and learn some very good lesstions lol

but with the exception of swarm cells and the queen is still in the hive, there is very little that you can't do tomorrow after you sleep on it and do some research.
I think right now this is a lot of it. Swarm cells, queens, and things that happen quickly.
 

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Yep, sure do. When I am in the hive and there is something to do, that I think cannot wait a week, I do it.

Usually it turns out OK.
 

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Does anyone else ever make a snap decision in the apiary then spend the rest of the day brooding about it wondering if it was the right thing to do
I used to do that a lot, but over time realized that if I thought something was right going thru one of the first colonies in a line, by the time I got to the end, I would have a different perspective on things. So now we do it differently. When doing hive checks, I check them all, and make notes on the yard sheet as I go thru them. When I've been thru them all, sit down with a cold drink and review the notes, then make a plan of action. Invariably after looking at them all, the plan will be different than if I had just started doing stuff immediately.

I think it makes a big difference based on how many colonies you are dealing with. If you have one or two then ya, you can ponder that one all day. OTOH, if you are going down a line of 20, at the end of the line you dont remember details of individual colonies unless they went onto the yard sheet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I used to do that a lot, but over time realized that if I thought something was right going thru one of the first colonies in a line, by the time I got to the end, I would have a different perspective on things. So now we do it differently. When doing hive checks, I check them all, and make notes on the yard sheet as I go thru them. When I've been thru them all, sit down with a cold drink and review the notes, then make a plan of action. Invariably after looking at them all, the plan will be different than if I had just started doing stuff immediately.

I think it makes a big difference based on how many colonies you are dealing with. If you have one or two then ya, you can ponder that one all day. OTOH, if you are going down a line of 20, at the end of the line you dont remember details of individual colonies unless they went onto the yard sheet.
I like this. Only being a few years in, it is easy to think things like swarming and queen cells are a RIGHT NOW kind of thing. But there is time to stop and think.
 

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All the time, but the problem-solving process is one of the things I enjoy about beekeeping. I learn something every time!
 

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Do make a distinction between brooding and rethinking though.
I have hives at home and across town. The ones at home get more frequent attention so I get fewer surprises and I always have all my gear nearby. sometimes I make snap decisions away from home and then later think I should have done something differently. I then decide to live with it or go back and do something different. Usually I just leave it and live with it but sometimes I go back and do it right.
Brooding about it doesn't help but you CAN rethink your approach. It's mostly a question of times. Rethink once and you are good. rethink multiple times and you are just wasting time and effort.
 

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When making snap decisions, and often times you must, keep in mind the phrase "primum non nocere", most importantly, do no harm. Don't do something which cannot be undone before thinking it through. This would include things like combining hives, culling queen cells (especially supercedure cells), and dispatching a queen.
 

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Most of the situations have been handled before, and there is a standard operating procedure for it.

Look at what resources are there, find what is missing or low, and correct the imbalance, Next hive, please.

Crazy Roland
 

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It was so nice to read all these posts. I do sometimes make myself crazy wondering for too long if I made the right change or no change to a hive. I try to go down with a plan and hopefully the right equipment, that is nice when it all seems to come together. One thing that is a constant in beekeeping is that there is always something to learn, the bees have it figured out, and we as beekeepers are just trying to help them succeed.
 

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:applause:It was so nice to read all these posts. I do sometimes make myself crazy wondering for too long if I made the right change or no change to a hive. I try to go down with a plan and hopefully the right equipment, that is nice when it all seems to come together. One thing that is a constant in Beekeeping, is that there is always something to learn, the bees have it figured out, and we as beekeepers are just trying to help them succeed.
 
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