Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New Year, New batch of BEETLES How many hives will we loss this year? Has anyone found a fix-all cure for these nasty beetles yet. I'll tryed all the oil traps etc, But not chemicals yet with No real results. Any suggestions
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Hello Dirtyt3, I use Gard Star on the ground around my hives and in them I use one Mike Hoods beetle trap and after the Drone cells is capped I remove the comb and replace frame with trap.I also use one AJ Beetle eater on top of the frames with screened botton boards. Staying on top of them is your best defense. Good luck, Henry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,866 Posts
Personally, I'm not in favor of Gard-star for a variety of reasons. But I want to eliminate the SHB in the hive. I've done a ton of trapping and all traps seem to work in different conditions and situations. All have benefits and drawbacks. All have varying degrees of success.

I was most impressed this fall when the temps were finally cool enough for me to apply formic acid in the Mite-Away II pads. There were still a large number of beetles running around the corners, being harrassed by the bees. I applied the pads on November 1 when we FINALLY got days with temps under 80 degrees (yeah, it was a weird fall). Directions say to leave pads on for 21 days.

I came back after Thanksgiving and started pulling pads and adding feed. There were no beetles present. I didn't have time to pull frames, but there were none to be found.

I can't wait until spring finally gets here. It's late, but I'm excited to see if I had any beetles overwinter in the cluster.

Grant
Jackson, MO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Henry and Grant I'm finding the SHBs blocking the cells under the bee clusters preventing the queens from laying blood early season before spring, after all the bees wintered the beetles all winter. I'ts time for the O'queens to get laying, having one month before honey flow starts in April. I have the bottum board oil traps, havent tried the BEETLE EAT traps yet, I do have the CD/DVD cases with side slots ground in, bated with German roach bait on the top of frames. I've made a between box trap with outside access, put between blood boxes, can put below-above anywhere in the hive.The anywhere trap is nomore than a 3/4 spacer that fits around the box rim with a 5" wide side chamber screened and slotted for outside access, could make the chamber though the middle, But so much for the bee space with either design.Used with glue traps, mice or papper or small trays of oil. I lost 6 hives through the winter 5 last summer, only differents SHB larva was in the summer losses, the story is the same (lots of honey stores, were 4 high 9" box hives ,But now no bees). We need some one to come up with BEETLE GO like BEE GO works. Yall think so. Thanks Dirtyt3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,827 Posts
Number one, in my opinion is to put your hives in a sunny location. SHB seem to thrive in shady yards.

I don't know what a German roach bait might be but I've heard some beeks use MaxiForce roach bait in theirs. Fipronil is the active ingredient. I'm not recommending it. I don't use it. It's illegal, as I'm sure the German roach bait is. Evidently it works.

4 9" boxes high may also add to the problem. If there's too much real estate, the bees will not actively protect those areas away from the brood nest. SHB can move in in large numbers and gain a foothold. I try to keep mine as crowded as possible. In the spring, when they get a couple of supers filled, I extract them, and return one at a time. Never bigger than 1 deep and 3 mediums in spring and summer and only 1 deep and 1 medium or 2 deeps in winter.

Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Dan I had the hives go up to 4 to 6-9" box high in the summer full of honey that they built up from 2-9'' after winter, I winter with 2-9" few may go 3 high depending on bee numbers as winter sets-in. For Pre-spring season I go 3-9" with 4 honey flames in bottum 4to 6 honey second box both with brood comb in the center of both, with fundation in third. The bees will fill the 2 brood boxes in April and start building and filling the fundation the third week of April. May comes about and they build and fill boxes very fast to the end of that mouth one 9" per week and a half to 2 weeks. I found the queen will respond to the size of the hive at pre-spring, She goes crazy and will lay 10 to 16 frames of brood by peak honey flow. As for the shade well all the hives are around some sort of wood line, vary few places to put them in full sun. The hives come out of winter with enough bees to cover all 20 frames. As of peak season they beard outside from the third box to the ground monster size and lots of beetles too.Thanks for INFO. I"ll try changing alittle as you pointed-out
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
I agree with Dan, re real estate, as well as unguarded entrances into the hive. My first approach is to make sure that all interior spaces are places where the bees can and do frequent - no extra frames/boxess, propped-up supers or lids, everything is screened tight & cranny free with a managable hive entrance.

I use a screened bottom board above a oil trap (west design or freeman) that catches a lot of beetles, mites and other vermin - the other taps are too difficult for me to manage.

I elevate my hives about 6" above ground level and spray (lightly) at nightime during the summer with permithrin under and around the hives.

I used formic acid pads (mite away II) late fall and it kicked their butts - as well as the mites.

Keep your hives tight, manage your accesses & crevaces & SHB will only be a inhabitant, not a destroyer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks Hoodswoods All hives are on stands of 12'' high. entrances are reduced until TEMP. gets above 80*F then removed. The larger the hives (that is the number of bees) the more the beetles. That's the part I have trouble comprehending, seems more bees would better defend the hive. I guess the traps are best for the summer honey flow and chemically treat in the fall and reduce estate when possible. Because the beetles are getting bad here in central Louisiana, really bad last year, all of the wild colonies in the hollow trees that's been there for years are now all gone. I"ll post through the season as how things go. Thanks a gain DirtyT3 and good luck with though BEES!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Thanks to all for sharing your knowledge on SHB. All my hives sits about 12" high on 12' long stands. Each hive has 1" restricted openings for now. Screened bottom boards has solid slide cover installed (want to find pans for oil traps to put under bottom screen). Dusted with powder sugar on 3-1-10. Restocked each hive with sugar syrup on 3-1-10 [email protected] All hives will have two 10" deeps with Queen Excluders. All boxes have 9 frames on spacer bars (bars was filled with acrylic latex silicone before nailing in box. No place for beetles to hide). I took an 1x8x40" long board, cut half " groves 1 and half "apart for 20 slots to hold AJ Beetle traps to fill and install tops on before placing in hives. The Mike Hood traps on frames are swapped out with another trap frame when needed.This Fall I will use Mite-Away-II Pads.I am going to make CD Cases into traps to put into entrance. I hope all a good year. Thanks, Henry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Sounds like a good plain, let us know how that goes through the season. I personaly would like to find a repellent that the bees could stand but not the beetles. Like stated before the SHB seems to be attracted to the larger hives. I cover a 20 mile radius of 15 to 20 hives, differences of locations, but never fails I loss the bigger-better-more productive hives. Just do not understand!!! Had 3 hives last summer I had to pull off 3-9" boxes(2 suppers 1 second brood box) filled with SHB larva per hvie. The hives went down in about 4 weeks right after the main honey flow. All hives that were loss where strong as h--l so many bees you couldn't hardly get the top back on after checking progress in the top suppers, that was added only 2 week prior. Never had this trouble before over 8 years of beekeeping. Thanks DirtyT3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ya, That looked to probably reduce over 80% or more SHB's at the entrance before they get into the hives. Thats a pretty good idea. How is the SHB situation in your neck of the woods going.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
I have a yard with 12 hives that all sit 12" high to screened bottom boards. This yard prior to setting up had landscape fabric laid and then 4" of crushed limestone spread over. I was doing this for weed control and a drier surface. Last year I saw one SHB in one hive in this yard. I also have hives that are on cinder blocks and 4x4's over dirt. These hives had what I consider a lot of beetles. (when you open hive they are on the inner covers). The small hive beetle needs to pupate in the ground and I wonder if the lime is burning them up. This year I will apply ag lime to the ground around the other hives to see if this will help. I figure the lime is relativley cheap and it certainly wont hurt the soil. I have spoken to people in the south who swear by using ordinary table salt- (handful to a quart of water in a spray bottle to mist there colonies and equipment) to control SHB & Varroa. I have not tried this so I have no idea if it works. It would be nice if it were that simple!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks bsupplier, Ya the salt water spray would be a nice trick if it works, not like I wouldn't give it a try. I tried everthing else, it is easier than shaking all the bees from the hive in to an empty box with a screened oil trap at the bottum. Done a few like that, so many SHBs to say if the beetles won't kill them this surely won't. As to the ground around the hives, I sprayed around the hives with little if any change. But seen something else as that to think about. My brother had some hardwood lumber sawed into boards, the day after thousands of SHBs were crowling all over the lumber. As to why, don't know, there are no hives around that location. Got to ask would spraying do any good if the beetles can fly in from any where. Thanks DirtyT3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Hello Dirtyt3 and Bsupplier. The SHBs here is getting so bad that I know I have to respond as much as I can. I will use the ground cover that Bsupplier stated. I have land that butts up to a 92 acre nursery. This is my perminant Apiary. I am planning on becoming a full time Beeman after my retirement. Found this site to share. Hope ya can make sense of my directions. Go to Search(beside New Post) click on.Type in (Found a lot of SHBs), click go.Click on Thread( Found a lot of SHBs), click on. Click on to page 2. Go to TonyL #15. Click on Beetle traps using diatomaceous earth. What I read there is all the info I have. I like to know if there is any negatives on using diatomaceous earth. Thanks, Henry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,243 Posts
I have been using diatomatious earth for a while without neagtive effect.
I'm currently doing an experiment using 3 methods in a yard with 12 hives and will report on the results as soon as I can open the hives ( after the heavy rain)
SHB is our biggest issue here in Queensland at this point and I constantly search for part solutions. Thanks to all for sharing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
Let's us assume, for the sake of discussion, that the entire life cycle of SHB is confined to the vertical limits of the hive and the immediate ground area under and surrounding it (a situation which I don't believe). If so, a simple, inexpensive (relatively speaking) bottom trap should result in a very high percentage of success - as much as any groundcover, chemical treatment, salt, lime or diatomaceous earth, in addition of killing any adults that fall into it.

If, like me, you believe that SHB's are everywhere, and can enter the hive from anywhere, then all you can control is what enters the hive, hides in the hive and falls down from the hive.

My SHB problem (which was bad, but never got into my comb), was eventually brought under control by 8 methods (I had no control over hive location, so full-time sun was not an option).

1. Every exterior hole and crack was hot-glued, screened and/or weather stripped.
2. Oil trap under SBB
3. Sealed up the underside of my top hive-box feeder (huge problem - I would knock it on the ground and 50 + would fall out with each weeks filling).
4. Very lightly sprayed (almost dribbled) permethrin late at night under and around the hive once a month or so - my bees generally don't crawl on the ground near the hive.
5. Utilized only 1 hive entrance that I knew was well-quarded
6. Tried to keep my box expansion within the limits of what the bees could manage
7. Sugar-dusted (fogged) which also knocked down some SHB
8. Formic pad treated late in fall - for varroa.

I was too late as varroa had decimated the population so I had a deadout earlier this spring, but it knocked the crap out of both pests - mite count and beetle count after treatment was down to zero - my oil pan just had bee debris in it. Post-mortum showed too small of cluster(s) for our untypical winter, but no larvae infected comb and plenty of stores.

I'm starting again this spring, going to use the same methods as last year, monitor & treat for mites much more dilligently (I had heard that mite issues weren't supposed to be a problem on 1st year hives) & it was very late summer/fall before I realized I had hundreds & hundred of mites falling into my trap before I acted.

The entrance trap link was most interesting, especially the way they controlled their entrance into the hive - made me think about how to use glue traps similarly. A project for another day.

If you have a garden nearby this spring, take a look inside some of the squash blooms and you'll find beetles - they say they are called nectar or pollen beetles, but they sure look like SHB to me - is diatomaceous earth a garden soil supplement? They're everywhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,243 Posts
Hoodswoods seems to be doing just about everything possible to keep the little fellows out and it will be interesting to see how it works out this season.
In our case the season never stops - we are in the subtropics.
I can't a nd don't want to use chemicals around my hives ( I keep chickens)
I'm told that SHB can fly at least 5 km - they will keep on coming. So this part is out of our control.
In hot weather I have lots of bees hanging out to cool off - a sign of a strong hive and what we want to keep SHB out BUT the problem is that when they hang out the SHB can be very active inside.
The solution seems to be to have strong hives but not too strong.
It is a balancing act all along.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Thanks once again to all . Yes I strongly agree that SHBs enters hives from everywhere they can from everywhere. Today this is my plan for my hives.#1-Finish out my bottle of Guard Star(drench),Purchase 10# or more of(diatomatious earth), dusting ground. Put limestone on ground under hives. Want to check out permethrin.#2-Control entry into hives to aid Bee guards.#3- Check into buying and installing front hive entrance trap from(http://beetlejail.com/2009/09).#4- ... into solar melter for cleaning.Thanks, Henry
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
Top