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I had a very strong hive last year, made a split from it into a nuc and gave it a queen that I raised. It managed through the cold months, but didnt have good egglaying when the other hives were loading the brood boxes, I found the queen and seen she had an injured leg, so removed her from the hive. There were a few eggs larva remaining. I inspected few days later but didnt see any queen cells. I pulled a mediocre frame from another hive with eggs, gave it a few days still no queencell, but wait there were a few eggs on the donated frame, and it has been more than 3 days. What's up, dead eggs? No eggs on other frames yet. Searched real hard and found a new queen. She must have came from the eggs early on and not the donated frame. I just missed the queencell someplace. OK, still not a strong egglayer. What to do with this nuc box and few frame of bees? I must have a poor queen line in this box or what? Should I swat this queen or give her some more time to turn on her egglaying?
 

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How long would you estimate the new queen has been laying? It does take some time before a newly mated queen lays a consistent brood pattern.
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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>How big is the nuc? Does it have enough bees to be slightly crowded? If not, I would downsize them until they get going strong. It has worked for several of my hives.

In my experience, downsizing to just what the bees cover for frames usually works to snap them out of dwindling. I've seen many a struggling, dwindling cluster take right off when they are in the appropriate sized box. I have boxes that are 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, and 10 frames and try to match the box to the number of frames that are covered with bees.
 
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