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Sixth year beekeeper here in Petaluma, California.

I've been fairly successful as a beekeeper, always keeping two to three hives. I used to keep my hives at a location, not at my house until last year when a vineyard near where my bees were kept, sprayed and it killed both my hives.

Because of the vineyards choice to spray, I decided to move my hives to my new house which was 10 miles away from where I kept them for the first five years as a beekeeper. I had a system where I would treat my bees for varroa mites each year at the very middle of October and for five years, this was a successful strategy.

Fast forward this year with new bees in two hives, again, just 10 miles away from where I was with my hives previous. All year my hives have thrived in their new location. I just went in the middle of October to pull all my honey and treat for varroa...both hives dead. Clear signs of being overcome with Varroa mites.

I can't believe how just 10 miles could make that big of a difference but the mite situation where my hives are now appear to be way, way worse. My neighbor just went into his hives today, also dead because of Varroa.

Next year I've going to pull honey and treat end of August to try and get ahead of the problem. I'll repeat it, I can't believe 10 miles makes that big of a difference but my previous locations plan had worked for five years...not anymore.

So disappointed.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Just hazarding a guess, but I would bet there were no other hives near your vineyard location and now that the hives are at your house, you have other nearby hives to contend with.
 
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Just hazarding a guess, but I would bet there were no other hives near your vineyard location and now that the hives are at your house, you have other nearby hives to contend with.
You know...I hadn't really thought about it but I 100% bet you're right. I know for a fact there are other hives around now where as before they were out in acres and acres of land all by themselves.

Well...an unfortunate lesson learned and now I'll have to adapt my schedule.
 

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6a 3rd yr 5 production hives 1/ 2 q resource hive
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Sorry you lost them. You started out with good intentions. Yes as the other poster mentioned there is likely other mite pressure about. Plus its been a weird year.
 

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I'm sorry to hear of your loss. Just a quick question-what was your mite monitoring protocol and hive maintenance? Hive don't die out overnight.
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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Sixth year beekeeper here in Petaluma, California.

I've been fairly successful as a beekeeper, always keeping two to three hives. I used to keep my hives at a location, not at my house until last year when a vineyard near where my bees were kept, sprayed and it killed both my hives.

Because of the vineyards choice to spray, I decided to move my hives to my new house which was 10 miles away from where I kept them for the first five years as a beekeeper. I had a system where I would treat my bees for varroa mites each year at the very middle of October and for five years, this was a successful strategy.

Fast forward this year with new bees in two hives, again, just 10 miles away from where I was with my hives previous. All year my hives have thrived in their new location. I just went in the middle of October to pull all my honey and treat for varroa...both hives dead. Clear signs of being overcome with Varroa mites.

I can't believe how just 10 miles could make that big of a difference but the mite situation where my hives are now appear to be way, way worse. My neighbor just went into his hives today, also dead because of Varroa.

Next year I've going to pull honey and treat end of August to try and get ahead of the problem. I'll repeat it, I can't believe 10 miles makes that big of a difference but my previous locations plan had worked for five years...not anymore.

So disappointed.
Now that you know what happens at each location, you can then plan accordingly.
I have several locations, some only 5 miles apart, every location is different in lots of ways.
good luck in the future, a spring treatment may be in order, also try to get some counts during the summer.

GG
 

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Sixth year beekeeper here in Petaluma, California.

I've been fairly successful as a beekeeper, always keeping two to three hives. I used to keep my hives at a location, not at my house until last year when a vineyard near where my bees were kept, sprayed and it killed both my hives.

Because of the vineyards choice to spray, I decided to move my hives to my new house which was 10 miles away from where I kept them for the first five years as a beekeeper. I had a system where I would treat my bees for varroa mites each year at the very middle of October and for five years, this was a successful strategy.

Fast forward this year with new bees in two hives, again, just 10 miles away from where I was with my hives previous. All year my hives have thrived in their new location. I just went in the middle of October to pull all my honey and treat for varroa...both hives dead. Clear signs of being overcome with Varroa mites.

I can't believe how just 10 miles could make that big of a difference but the mite situation where my hives are now appear to be way, way worse. My neighbor just went into his hives today, also dead because of Varroa.

Next year I've going to pull honey and treat end of August to try and get ahead of the problem. I'll repeat it, I can't believe 10 miles makes that big of a difference but my previous locations plan had worked for five years...not anymore.

So disappointed.
Did you treat the packages? My early dead-out problems went away when I raised my own bees and split with selected queens. I had one out of six packages over two years survive winter. That became the bee breeder hive for my 8 to 10 hive apiary using purchased queens and open-mated supercedure queens or swarm queen cell.
 

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Next year I've going to pull honey and treat end of August to try and get ahead of the problem. I'll repeat it, I can't believe 10 miles makes that big of a difference but my previous locations plan had worked for five years...not anymore.
I am not in your locale but I would suggest at the beginning of August, as soon as supers are removed. I used to treat my hives in September and was having significant losses. I moved the mite treatment up to the first week of August and brought my losses to less than 20%.
FWIW
 

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I've been fairly successful as a beekeeper, always keeping two to three hives
"successful" is very open ended, what were your losses like?

until last year when a vineyard near where my bees were kept, sprayed and it killed both my hives.
Well lets talk pesticide kill..
your mite protocol would be inadequate in most places(as you found when you moved) so I can't help but wonder if maybe some one placed some bees with in a few miles of the old location
So when did the kill happen and what did it look like ? What was sprayed on what to kill what pest? did they not spray in the past years? I have run in to a lot of pestiside kills, that weren't, so just asking

Location matters immensely, but so does stock. You bought replacement bees were they the same genetics from the same supplier and the same format (nucs vs packages?
 
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