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Nice video. I like your method.
You may want to go to your profile and add your location. Things sometimes make more sense when readers can see where you are. Like splitting in February.
Also, when you relocate your nucs and add a queen, what is your acceptance rate? I find that if I immediately add a queen in a cage, by the time she is released they will have already started emergency cells and will kill the introduced queen. What I do now is to add the cage but make sure that it is capped so that she can’t be released, then check in about a week and remove any emergency cells….then remove the cage cap. Or…I make sure that the only brood in the new nuc is capped or nearly so. That way they start out as hopelessly queenless. If I don’t take those measures I find my acceptance runs below 50%.
Just my experience.
 

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Watching the video, I have to ask...where is the sealed and emerging brood?

I never wait to introduce a queen. We make the nucs, take the. to the new apiary, and give them a caged queen. In 10 days we check to see if she's laying. This year, after making 350 nucs, only 5 rejected their caged queen. At ten days another was given after the emergency cells were removed, another queen was given. All 5 accepted the second queen.
 

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I never wait to introduce a queen.
I'm sure that you have more inclusive bees than I do. It has been frustrating to go back to remove the cages only to find a load of emergency cells and no sign of the introduced queen. Sadly.... in my yards it happens more often than not if the split isn't already hopelessly queenless. I'm happy that it works for you.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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I thought foxhoney said he was installing queen cells into the nucs? Essentially five frame mating nucs.
 

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Would it be a consideration to put that top box on the bottom board and shake the bees into that one. next day after the bees have moved up, remove the previously bottom box with a queen cell placed to the new site. Just thinking of significance of MP's comment about the lack of emerging brood in the split. It will be quite a while before there will be foragers.
 

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Just thinking of significance of MP's comment about the lack of emerging brood in the split. It will be quite a while before there will be foragers.
It does look like foxhoney is splitting awful early.
I did go back and listen again and, indeed, he is installing cells. I expect that would make all the difference. Sorry about my first post.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
there is sealed brood in the bottom box. the nuc in the video has 2 frames of young open brood in the top half. If i notice there is not enough brood in the top half i will swap a frame from the bottom up. I like the bottom box to stay strong so i can put another box of comb ontop and split again in two weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I mostly use queen cells for my nuc splits. if we do use a caged queen, we introduce at the end of the day, roughly 6 hours after splitting.
 

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yes, what you describe is a good way to make the split more even in population and strength. my goal is to sell the splits in 3 weeks when the queen has been established and the previously uncapped young brood is now emerged or about to emerge making for an ideal situation for us to sell them.
 

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I am curious, would it be better or not to move the mother hive and leave the split so it can get the return8ng foragers?
 

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If you are doing it successfully it is not wrong!

That is quite a number of nucs to deal with, so how long it takes to "get 'er done" has to be factored in. If the only criteria was to do it in the method of most guaranteed results and strongest splits possible then our suggestions likely would have merit.

I saw a signature line that said "Perfection is the enemy of good enough". I have seen cases where I know it was so.
 

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If you are doing it successfully it is not wrong!

That is quite a number of nucs to deal with, so how long it takes to "get 'er done" has to be factored in. If the only criteria was to do it in the method of most guaranteed results and strongest splits possible then our suggestions likely would have merit.

I saw a signature line that said "Perfection is the enemy of good enough". I have seen cases where I know it was so.
Thanks, good enough is always good enough for me!
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Deb, I see that Daniel is planning on splitting the bottom nuc again in three to four weeks. He will need the foragers to keep the supplies coming in for the build up. The split on the other hand wont have a laying mated queen for another three weeks, plenty of time for the nurse bees to transition.
 

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Deb, I see that Daniel is planning on splitting the bottom nuc again in three to four weeks. He will need the foragers to keep the supplies coming in for the build up. The split on the other hand wont have a laying mated queen for another three weeks, plenty of time for the nurse bees to transition.
I wish my weather and flow would permit me to do that multiple times in a season!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Deb, I see that Daniel is planning on splitting the bottom nuc again in three to four weeks. He will need the foragers to keep the supplies coming in for the build up. The split on the other hand wont have a laying mated queen for another three weeks, plenty of time for the nurse bees to transition.
Yes! we do exactly that from february to may in florida, then may-july in wisconsin.
 
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