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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,
What do you think about a hive that opens from the side and the panels side in and out on rails?

amos
 

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My first thought is it would be way too sticky with propolis to be possible.
 

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Was already tried more than one hundred years ago, or so. I guess you may wonder why we don't do it that way today - I don't.

When you make it, let us know how it works, for you, and please post pictures, too. BTW, what do you mean by "panels"?
 

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I'd love to see one that works well. I have seen a few pictures of such things, but I can't imagine how to design it to work well. You'd end up with a three sided box. How does that hold together? Then you have the issue of propolis and I only have one space that I can get to to loosen it and there must be some kind of rest at the top on the opposite side, I would assume...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes, the propolis. That would be a problem. What I was thinking was were each individual comb would be suspended by a top rail. They would slide out individually. (except for the propolis). A three sided box wouldn't be a problem i don't think. The access door would have to be hinged. Oh well.

Hey how about this.
A hole cut in the side of a standard hive. Fasten a glass piece from the inside. Then add a hinged door on the outside of the glass panel. You could have a looking hole. Or I guess a window in the side of the hive with a closable door over it???

Amos
 

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Hey how about this.
A hole cut in the side of a standard hive. Fasten a glass piece from the inside. Then add a hinged door on the outside of the glass panel. You could have a looking hole. Or I guess a window in the side of the hive with a closable door over it???

Amos
Wow, I've thought of trying this someday, too. If you do attempt it, please let us know how it works! I think it would be so kewl to view the girls in this way. :applause:
 

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I would never let the fact that something was tried a hundred years ago and didn't work stand in the way. We've got a whole new world of materials to work with today.

Sure we still have propolis but do we have material that it will not cling to so tenaciously? Would teflon slides work?

Just a thought. (A share in profits would be appreciated. :D )

Wayne
 

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Cabinet hives? Like these?



Buy it, new, from Switzerland!

These are still fairly popular in Switzerland and Germany. They are declining in use in Germany mostly due to building codes, as these are usually placed several together in a "bee house". They are slower to work, virtually non-portable, require two specialized tools (sort of). On the up-side. Working inside a bee house means you can almost ignore the weather outside with little or no disturbance to the bees.

Many Germans lament about building code requirements essentially eliminating their opportunity/ability to keep bees in these hives. Apparently, construction permits are on extremely limited availability with very strict requirements for space around each structure, property lines, etc.

If you've ever wanted a beehive in your garage or garden shed, this is the way to go. They come in varying sizes (height), too, so you need not worry that this three-high (brood + two store) is sufficient. Each hive is strictly limited, though, to the available internal space, so if you expect very large colonies you should buy/build a large hive.

It's really very sad to know America is so tightly standardized on the stackable 10-frame Langstroth boxes, nothing else is available for the hobbyist. It's sorely tempting to open a joinery and commercially build Dadant and other hives, primarily for the hobby/sideline markets.
 
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