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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am coming out of a long drought in my region. We had rain one day in the previous month and I continued to feed the girls on sugar syrup. I got more rain for a few days in this month. I am now seeing nectar in the hives. However in one hive the bees are loading nectar every where, in the brood chamber, in the supers, just anywhere they can put it. I can't seem to super up the hive fast enough, e.g in one week I was able to fill one shallow with 9 frames of nectar.

My problem is I am not seeing any eggs or brood nor can I find the queen, and as I said the brood chamber is filled with nectar. How can I get the bees to release the brood chamber to the queen?

I tried exchanging some frames in the brood chamber with foundation. These they filled with nectar, I even tried going foundation less but as they start drawing comb it gets filled with nectar. My hive is set up as 2 deeps for the brood chamber and shallows above the deeps for the honey supers.

My question again is. How can I get the bees to release the brood chamber to the queen? I.E if there is still a queen in this hive.
 

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Well, if there are no eggs, and no brood, then my first guess is that you have no queen in that hive.

If we approach the situation with the assumption that the hive is indeed queenless, then I guess your options would start looking like:
A)Try to get them queenright again (either by adding frames of brood for them to make their own queen, or by giving them a queen directly)
B)Take advantage of their zeal for producing honey for you now that they have no brood to raise. It may cost you the hive in the end, but they sound like they may just be creating enough excess for the honey to make it worthwhile to maintain the status quo for a while (my opinion only, of course...nobody can make that decision for someone else). ...then maybe just split another hive into that one to get it started up again once they start to dwindle.


...Just my $0.02 opinion, but it may be something to consider. If you decide to try to save the hive, I'd recommend giving them a frame of eggs/fresh brood every week until you see them make a queen cell on one...they'll be more likely to accept a queen at that point.
 

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i say u need to determine for sure theres no queen,if there is and shes not laying,she's no good.either way personally i would order a new queen pretty quick to,get buildup started and hopefully fend off chance of having a laying worker,plus where's the queen going to lay if everything is full of nectar,the sooner you queen the less the bees will have to move for the queen.which they should do once a good queen is in the hive.
 

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Get a queen ordered quickly. When you install her, give them a new deep brood box, preferably with comb, for her to occupy when they release her.
Regards,
Steven
 

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If you find queen cells, I'd put them in a split and open the brood chamber. She may be slimming down to swarm and the girls are back filling the brood chamber with stores to support the remaining colony until her successor gets busy. They may go no matter what you.

Beyond that, I'd give them a frame of fresh eggs to raise a new queen. If you re-queen without knowing for sure she is gone, they will do in your purchase and effort.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks, I will take all your advice into consideration. Yes I checked more than once for a queen. However I haven't seen any nor any eggs or brood. I think my best bet is to add a few frames of eggs from another colony and see if they will create a new queen. Yes Throrope
I have been considering the idea that the colony may be making preparation to swarm. However I haven't sen any queen cells as yet.
 
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