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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Property House Siding Tree Home

This pic was taken on the 28th (over a week ago). Took a look yesterday and he was hanging out under the bottom of the hive (it's propped up on some wood scraps to stabilize and level it) and then today he was hanging out in front of it again just right on the top of where he is in the picture above. Bees were coming and going with no concerns of him. I do have this hive with a VERY small entrance (stock reducer stick thing)... they were a small cluster that I caught on the 23rd and are slow building but building none the less... capped brood as of yesterday as well as fresh eggs and larva.

He was puffing up his throat and doing his little dance today, there was another one below near the ground (assuming female).
 

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This pic was taken on the 28th (over a week ago). Took a look yesterday and he was hanging out under the bottom of the hive (it's propped up on some wood scraps to stabilize and level it) and then today he was hanging out in front of it again just right on the top of where he is in the picture above. Bees were coming and going with no concerns of him. I do have this hive with a VERY small entrance (stock reducer stick thing)... they were a small cluster that I caught on the 23rd and are slow building but building none the less... capped brood as of yesterday as well as fresh eggs and larva.

He was puffing up his throat and doing his little dance today, there was another one below near the ground (assuming female).
I'm from South Florida. Green Anoles are native to the U.S - it's the brown anoles that came from Cuba and the Islands that are an invasive species threatening the green anoles.

With that said, I highly doubt anoles will prove any threat to your beehive. Bees can defend themselves and their hives from lizards, and I'd imagine anoles know better than to risk messing with bees. I would imagine they are hanging around and eating other kinds of pests such as ants or even wax moths.

Found a thread you should read as well:

http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php?topic=25460.10;wap2
 

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I've never known one of those critters to eat bees or wasps. He's probably more likely to keep pests out of the hive.
 

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Remember, since these Anoles are native and important creatures, even if they did prove to be a threat - it would be messed up to do anything about it (other than setting up your hive stand in a way to prevent them from getting on/near the hives).

Brown anoles (invasive) will cannibalize on the green anoles, so the brown ones can be dispatched without any second thought.

That said, I doubt your green friend is worth being concerned about. They are beautiful lizards.
 

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>Michael, spiders on the other hand WILL trap bees in their webs and suck them dry - correct?

Yes. If they get too fat, I catch them and take them a couple hundred yards away... but usually I just leave them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I am a live and let live kind of guy... I have wasps nest and various things around. I will take the next down but not kill the wasps if they become too big for their location (a door way).

I was thinking he might be almost acting like a guard helping keep other pest out or even maybe if robbers are in a tussle he might take advantage of the fight and snatch a meal (though that means he might get a guard bee as well).

I had no intentions of harming him. Maybe relocating him but that is it. I've even got my 4 year old daughter trained in the live and let live way of life. She will catch a roach in the house and bring it outside if she sees one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The lizard doesn't bother me, but what catches my eye is that it looks like your hive is sitting on an A/C unit. Is it?
Yes it is... it helps them get some lift when leaving the hive and keeps the hive nice and warm.

Just kidding. It is on an AC unit, but that is A.) temporary because my space for keeping them was NEVER prepped and I just started getting swarms and cut outs WAY before I was ready (good problem), B.) It actually has a leak in the inside coil so it's not a running AC unit for now. This unit goes to my shed, so it's not very critical to be running. I have a guy ready to change it, I'm just trying to find my original paperwork because it is under warranty and will save me about $900 bucks if I can find it!

I was wondering if anyone was going to say something about it. ;)
 

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I've never seen one of these little guys eat a bee but I did see one wrestle a bee for a dead pupa. It was quite a tussle. The anole did finally win and the bee flew off unscathed. I love my natives. I even had a hard time coming to terms with dispatching invasive bufo toads until I became a beek and they kept snatching my bees! Off with their heads! They can eat a ton of bees. Hum.....I don't seem to have a problem with them anymore. The word must have gotten out. And, yes, I do rescue my bees from spider webs but spiders catch mosquitoes, too. Roaches, I draw the line. Don't tell your daughter
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yeah, when I had a "pet" praying mantis, I found that you can single handedly remove all of the crickets from your yard... it became very hard to find any to feed him for a while.

Roaches have a bad rap. I agree, I am conditioned to find them gross myself, but to break the cycle I teach her to embrace them. She thinks they are "cute" and ask if I want to pet or hold them when she has one. I'll pet them for her but no real desire to hold it. :)
 
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