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I have a two 10 frame deep hive (is that how you say it?)
the bottom has lots of capped brood and nectar.
The top has 8 full frames of honey.
I just treated with formic pro two days ago and they look very active and healthy, so far not any much dead bees on the ground and don't see anybody being dragged out. I had 7 mites to half cup of bees when I did the wash.
I live not far from Cayuga Lake and have not had a frost yet and not even close to having a frost in the ten day forecast.
So all that being said should I be feeding them at this point?
 

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Short answer is yes although from your description they may be fine. You are wise to note the weather. If you do feed 2:1, they need time to dry it. Mites are #1 killer followed closely by starvation. I also have totes in storage with extra frames of honey set aside for emergencies. There's nothing worse then having them get through winter only to starve right before a spring nectar flow and before they take liquid feed.

PS- keep hammering mites until you have close to 0. After this we will cover wrapping, insulating and ventilating for winter. It gets cold in your part of the world.
 

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That was a heavy mite load! I hope you got it knocked down. I would weigh the colony and feed until your two deeps weighs 125-140 lbs. You have a fairly long winter ahead and I would make sure the bees have all the stored they may need.
 

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That was a heavy mite load! I hope you got it knocked down. I would weigh the colony and feed until your two deeps weighs 125-140 lbs. You have a fairly long winter ahead and I would make sure the bees have all the stored they may need.
Thank you, I hope the formic acid does the trick. I will start feeding them.
 

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125 lbs gross for a double 10 frame deep; bottom board, two boxes and an inner cover, has been a very common recommendation in the north for Carni type bees and a bit more for Italians. That has been my target weight for well insulated hives. I probably could go lighter but would not for colonies only covered with a bee cozy or similar that is little more than token insulating value.

I dont know what video you are referring to but I think I have seem Michael state he winters double deep and a medium but that was a number of years ago.
 

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A deep super full of honey can weigh 85+ pounds, so double that plus the weight of the other wooden ware and bees. Weight of equipment varies from day to day due to moisture, it would be impossible to give weight down to the ounce.
 

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That's useless to a lot of people who don't have the same bottom boards and inner covers as you.
You certainly have a strange way of looking for information--------. The variation in the weights of typical bottom boards or inner covers would be of relatively little significance to the suitable ball park figure of 125 lbs.

You can rest assured you wont get any further useless information from me.:rolleyes:
 

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👍:)
Quote "We will need lances as tall as a man." reply: "But some men are taller than others...."
Of course your location and type of bees will vary. Start with whatever recommendation seems most pertinent and most local and revise in future based on your own observations. I go for 5/8 honey (just south of Albany NY). So for your 20 frames I would want 12.5 frames honey (mostly capped). I often overwinter on 8 deeps, so they get 5 frames honey. I do monitor in spring and only rarely do they need suplemental feed before the flow and / or splitting.
 

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Speaking about wintering, we came back from vacation and most hives were backfilled in the bottom deeps; I thought if I put on some supers they would move the nectar/honey around but they didn’t. What would you do?
 

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cloverdale " What would you do?" I would say "great" and leave them alone. It is a long time until Spring. I have taken all supers off early due to this drought. All hives are strong, maybe too strong. I did find two hives building up some stores in the one super left on for each hive. I use it draw out some comb and often get some nice Fall honey. It conflicts with OAV treatments. This year every little bit left is going back to them - one hive. I can't pour 2:1 fast enough right now.
 

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“Cloverdale”. I’m with Robert. I’m going for backfilling. I’d be happy if I were in your physical shoes. I’m in the topping off phase. Winter forecast reports here indicate long cold one. No mites, no starvation.
 

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Thank you both; my concern was that there was no room in the broodnest, in other areas some capped brood but no room for egg laying. Some hives there are still eggs. They are still bringing in pollen here so I figured the queen would still be laying somewhat. I was taken aback at the flow still going with the lack of rain we have had.
 
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