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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like to hear different opinions on this. I usually keep my feeder on all year around, because it's the foam feeder, that fits on top and its convienent. I usually only feed June-Oct, but thought about putting them some syrup in there.

Thoughts on that? They are finding pollen, but thought about giving them both. Thanks in advance for help! I love to see my little bees eat up!
 

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You should be seeing a nectar flow soon if not right now. So, how strong are your colonies? How much honey do your hives have in them? Are they light and hungry? If so, feed. If not, let Nature provide.
 

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My bees are storing nectar (future honey) now. You and I seem to both be quite close to the northern North Carolina border, so I am guessing your bees are also actively hauling in nectar at this point. If you feed from now into the fall, how would you distinguish between 'syrup' and 'honey' come harvest time?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My bees are storing nectar (future honey) now. You and I seem to both be quite close to the northern North Carolina border, so I am guessing your bees are also actively hauling in nectar at this point. If you feed from now into the fall, how would you distinguish between 'syrup' and 'honey' come harvest time?
That is what I thought as well. I just don't want them to ever get hungry :) We are getting in the hives today to check them out. We are also adding 3 more hives tomorrow. Now those will have to be fed :) Thank you for your reply!
 

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Feeding new hives close to more established hives can be tricky due to possible robbing by the more established hive.

I suggest not using the common Boardman (entrance style) feeders as they as likely to be a problem. Feed the new hives with some kind of feeder that is internal to the hive and not close to the entrance. Restrict the hive entrance opening to just what is needed for the traffic. And I would consider NOT using any kind of feed additive that makes the syrup smell more attractive.
 

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I can't believe that anyone would think that it is all right to feed bees in summer for anything other than an extreme situation. What am I missing?
 

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Many people feed there bees during a dearth, and you are not missing anything. It is a different management style and if you don't like it, feel free not to do it. I live in a hjgh desert with a very short growing season. Less than four months. I feed bees when they don't have capped frames of honey any time the supers are off. I feed bees to draw foundation. I feed bees to raise bees so I can make a crop in my short season. I feed bees to bring them up to a weight of 130Lbs to allow them a shot at living thru the winter. I put dry sugar on top of the frames so they have feed if they winter at the top of the stack and use up the stored honey. I know commercial beeks who make a good living selling both bees and honey that plan on around $100 per colony of feed. Beekeeping is all local and situations and practices vary.

I can't believe that anyone would think that it is all right to feed bees in summer for anything other than an extreme situation. What am I missing?
 

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We get a long summer Dearth from June-late Sept. if you don't keep a close watch on them in Aug-Sept. they will starve out and crash. So we either move them to greener pasture or have to feed during the summer.
 
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