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Discussion Starter #1
I’m looking to get a shed possibly to store equipment and get licensed for food manufacturing so I can sale to stores. Also just would like to not do it in my garage anymore. Anyone use a shed pictures and experiences would be appreciated. Plumbing for sinks and what you use for hot water source are of interest. Minimum size? I was thinking 12x16. My wife makes elderberry syrup and id like to set it up for her to possibly have a licensed place to make and maybe sale a bit online.
 

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Burlington, MA. Langs
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You are better off talking to your town about what the Codes & Fees are for this. In order to get certified to do this you need to pass all the codes and inspections.
They may say that you need to have a Concrete floor. With out knowing what is required we can't tell you what works.

Call the town and ask for a Home Kitchen Inspector. Or Code enforcement officer.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don’t live in a town and the codes are on the state health services website. Good manufacturing practice is a term that’s used a two basin ss sink for dish washing hot water supply and a sink for hand washing. Basic reqs. Texas puts honey extraction as low risk.
 

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A beekeeper I know who has gotten out of it but did it for 30 years out of his garage had a license the whole time and never got inspected once. States are different but inspection is not a requirement here but they can inspect you if they decide to.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Linda is right, the first step is finding out what the requirements for a certified kitchen are. I suspect 12×16 is too small to include storage of anything but the supers you intend to extract. Since you will need power, water, and sewage, you will need to get permits for all the above as well. I would go 20×20 and have some extra space.

Virginia requires a three basin sink, wash rinse, sanitize and a hand sink. Hot water must be 130°F at the tap. I rcommend a tankless waterheater since usage is sporadic. Floors and walls must be impervious to liquids. Doors left open during processing must be screened.
 

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Again I’m more focused on if there’s people that have done it I realize you from liberal states have way more strict restrictions but if a 30 year old van can make and serve tacos here I’m pretty sure I can make a shed into an extraction facility and I’ve looked up Texas laws they are not that strict. If you have used a shed please respond if not this maybe a dead end thread and not the place for your input but I’ve seen a couple examples of people doing it on the YouTube.
 

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I didn’t ask legal questions I asked about size and plumbing of sinks and if anyone was doing it
 

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I literally asked about size of building and plumbing of sinks And a hot water source and pictures of setup if anyone had one. I mentioned I was planning to use it as a licensed facility I guess that’s where people got on that.
 

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You asked several questions with twists.
First building size? ( I was thinking 12x16 ) If you have been working from your garage is it as big as you are thinking for your shed if you store equipment and extract? This also depends on how much equipment you have. I have a 20 x 40 and a 12 x 12 building just for equipment. At present I use our 2 car garage for extracting and have to put it all away.

( My wife makes elderberry syrup and id like to set it up for her to possibly have a licensed place to make )
For this you would need an oven. This changes everything as Honey and processed food are totally 2 different things.
My son wanted to build a 8 x 10 shed for one of his hobbies and I told him it was to small.
We laid it out in my wood shop and moved my 4 x 8 bench in the middle and he said your right dad. (I am blessed with great CHILDREN)
We are now going to build a 12 x 12 building for him.

You need to answer your own questions based on how much equipment you have and how much you want to grow in the future and if your wife wants to per-pair food in the same building you have old comb and boxes stored?
Not trying to be nasty just giving you something to think about.
When I get ready to build my extracting room it will be at least 20 x 20 just to have room to move and grow.
 

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I have a 12 x 16 shed I’m currently working out of and it got small quick. I added a 10 x 16 lean too on the back and a 12 x 10 lean too on the side. I’m running out of space again. My recommendation would be to go Big as if as you can.
 

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Same here, think of the size you think you need, triple it, and then maybe it'll still be OK in a few years. Remember for things like sheds the sides around the walls may not be totally clear all the time if you hang tools on the walls, or if the roof slope makes it impassable due to lack of overhead clearance. If you build high enough for a lofted storage, it may help too as long as you are comfortable retrieving things while standing on a ladder. If there are changes later on and beekeeping doesn't work out for you for some reason, your lawn tractor or table saw will thank you for the extra space anyways :)
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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I am going to guess that the "you from liberal states" comment was directed at me. Virginia unfortunantly has gone blue to the utter disgust of most of the counties that are as red as they come. I build those "taco vans" as a side job so it is necessary for me to know what it takes to get a commercial kitchen to pass a health dept inspection. You threw a huge wrench into it when you added the canning operation. As far as shed sizes, I have a 12×16 shed in my backyard. There is no way it is big enough for what you have in mind. We are all trying to be helpful, even if you do not see it that way.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I guess I should of added this “shed” would be a new building dedicated to extracting equipment not housing a lawn mower and table saw.
 

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amk , I was thinking along the same line as you and i pretty much decided on a 12x10 size as sufficient for an extracting shed only with super storage , Iv'e been working out of my 40 x 60 building that is used for my business and everything else i get into and want to get licensed also and thought maybe this would be the best way to go , there have been some other threads on this that should pop up for you with a search , I've since decided to stud out a bigger area in my shop for my extracting room but think your idea is very doable , if i find the thread im talking about i will pass it on , good luck
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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I literally asked about size of building and plumbing of sinks And a hot water source and pictures of setup if anyone had one. I mentioned I was planning to use it as a licensed facility I guess that’s where people got on that.
AMK 12x16 seems small to me, I have a 24x52 garage and it is somewhat full of boxes and lumber.
IF you build / paint/ store hive and hive parts, I would make it in 2 or 3 rooms. A wood working room and a "kitchen" room maybe.
I have seen in Milk parlors on farms I visit a 1/4 inch plastic wall liner. I asked and they literally hose the place down if needed. (water proof walls)

So IMO plunb it for water as needed, put something on the walls you can power wash. Get measurements and layout of de capper, extractor, bottling station and full honey boxes storage, wet box storage. If you use a fork lift then a door that can be driven in , just mentally think thru a season and build away.

I extracted in my garage last year,,, worked but I "wanted" a way to heat the supers, storage for wet boxes, sit down bottling, and a few other niceties.

I can see myself in the same boat as you in 2-4 years
I almost opened a restaurant several years ago. Here in Mich. there are places that have used restaurant equipment, Stainless steel sinks can be "reused" so shop around a bit all new is not necessary.

Or maybe reach out to some of your bee keeper friends that are having bee sheds and go look and ask them what they would do different.

GG
 

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If it were me...

1. Hand washing sink
2. 50 gallon water heater
3. Hot/cold spigot
4. Mop basin for rinsing extractor, buckets, capping tank.
5. Good dishwasher for jars and lids

I would not be concerned about a triple basin sink.
 
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