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On our rainy day spring 1st inspection, we found this raggedy wing queen accompanied by as many SHB as worker bees. Most of the SHB's dove into empty cells as we exposed them to light. The colony had been Apivared 8/8/18 - 10/19/18. So what killed it? This 5 hive site had lost 2 colonies prior to treatment and this one after treatment. The alive colonies were one good and one great, the three empty spots were set up as bait hives. This site has for several years been stocked only by trapping on the stands.
 

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So what killed it? This 5 hive site had lost 2 colonies prior to treatment and this one after treatment.
Frank: You likely had a fairly heavy viral load in the yard, which could have been why your other 2 hives died prior to treatment. Could you have treated, killed the mites, but their fates were already sealed because the viral load in the hives? Apivar will kill the mites, but not the viruses. Only a guess.

But as a guy that lives in SHB-heaven, I do not think the SHB were factors at all. They are the vultures that showed up to the party.
 

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CCD was the cause of death of course. It was totally out of your hands ��
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
CCD was the cause of death of course. It was totally out of your hands 😆
I read that this kind of cluster was the true definition of CCD, which I have always thought was a poorly defined disease. We have found two the same this spring, both full of food, next to surviving colonies, Apivared on Randy Oliver's schedule dates.
 

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But as a guy that lives in SHB-heaven, I do not think the SHB were factors at all. They are the vultures that showed up to the party.
SHB can rapidly finish a hive that, without them, could possibly been saved.

Treatments aren't always successful. Was the Apivar freshly opened? Was it applied in sufficient quantity? Unless you did a mite count afterward, you don't really know.

Then again, treatments and viruses, IMO, can both do in the queen. After treatments, I do see some hive failure with the accompanying SHB. It's not fun, but it's my reality.

I've been reading again about neonicontinoids and CCD; however, I doubt that they would be a factor in Frank's location.
 

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CCD Definition: Phenomenon that occurs when the majority of worker bees in a colony disappear and leave behind a queen, plenty of food and a few nurse bees to care for brood.

PMS Definition: A condition that causes a honey bee colony to deteriorate and eventually dwindle to a small cluster of bees, with plenty of food, that may or may not contain the queen.


Hmmmm . . .
 

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I thought it was generally recognized that CCD was not a disease in and of itself, rather a broad term used to define a hive death for unknown reasons. Perhaps it is mites, maybe it is neonicitinoids, or could it be due to the effects of gamma rays on man-in-the-moon marigolds?

Interesting though that the more we understand about mites and the viruses they vector, the fewer the deaths being attributed to CCD.
 
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