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NO!!!!

Bees poisoned with carbaryl can take 2–3 days to die, appearing inactive as if cold. It allows them time to take contaminated nectar and pollen back to the colony. Some crops treated with Sevin under the wrong conditions (in bloom, using a dust formulation, with large numbers of bees in the field) have been responsible for disastrous kills. Sevin is one of the United States' most widely used insecticides for a wide variety of insect pests. It is also one of the most toxic to honey bees, in certain formulations. These should never be sprayed on flowering crops especially if bees are active and the crop requires pollination.
 

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Bti dust (Bacillus thuringensis israeliensis) is extremely effective on cabbage worms and other caterpillars and completely bee safe.

Why even risk using Sevin when there is something else that will do the job with zero chance of harming bees?

If you dust your brassicas with Bti powder about every 10-14 days all season (and it only takes a tiny bit, I have a "Dustin Mizer" duster that puts out an extremely fine cloud) you'll have zero cabbage worms. Also great for tomato hornworms.
 

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Try timing your crop.
In Wisconsin we get the looper caterpillars end of June. (Which is what I assume you want to dust for) I just plant my broccoli early enough so I have harvested before the end of June. No caterpillars, no seven dust....all organic.
 

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I believe that some packaging of sevin is labelled for killing "bees". It's rare to find an exterminator who will kill bees, but when you do, this is what they use. I've cut out hives that have been hit with sevin dust; there are lots of dead bees, but colony still lives.
 

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I believe that some packaging of sevin is labelled for killing "bees". It's rare to find an exterminator who will kill bees, but when you do, this is what they use. I've cut out hives that have been hit with sevin dust; there are lots of dead bees, but colony still lives.
I don't know any pest control operators using Sevin for bee or wasp control any longer. Homeowners probably are the largest users of Sevin and other carbamates.
 

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Why not try some natural alternatives first? I have friends that homestead, growing everything under the sun, and they only use organic natural treatments on their fruits, veggies and flowers with great results.
 

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Pixie, I agree, I grow over 17 different crops and the two years we've been microfarming our property (we have about a half acre, only 1/4 of that is used for crops), we have only used organic fertilizers and no pesticides, we tend to yield much more than we as a family can consume, so it can be done. Not to mention, I don't want to subject my kids, pets or bees to harsh chemicals. I also know sometimes people do what they have to do, and I don't fault them for that either. Natural whenever possible is my motto.
 

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I am not an expert on anything other than try, try again, but at my garden (N.E. Florida), we use about 1/2 oz. of spearmint oil in 1 gallon of water, we have tons of those little leaf eating caterpillars around here and they hate the stuff, the bees on the other don't mind it at all, doesn't slow pollination down one bit. We try to remain as organic as possible, so essential oils and ladyugs do the brunt of the work, the bees enjoy the smell and an upside is, exposure to the spearmint oil is detrimental to Varroa Mites, downside, you have to apply it often, about twice a week depending on rainfall. Spearmint oil runs about 6 bucks a bottle, steep, but we feel it's worth it.

Good luck on your search, there's alot of options.
 

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I agree with the others...NO SEVIN. Also, generally speaking it is better to use liquids or sprays rather than powdered pesticides. There are some that are time based ie. you spray at dark when the bees have gone in...and by daylight (after a few hours) the effacacy of the pesticide has diminished (after doing its thing.) to the point it is no longer harmful to bees. That said, my wife and I prefer the more natural approaches to pest control...and seek ways to do what we need to do that are least harmful to the bees and the environment.
 

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baits are another route for you to consider. provided they are delivered in a bee-proof enclosure, the exposure to honey bees will be minimal or 0. DuPont Advion (Indoxacarb) bait arenas have been working very well in professional ant control :



or there are other baits like terro (boric acid in a sugar bait), maxforce, Amdro (hydramethylnon), or several others.

I'd stay away from the arsenic or fipronil based baits.

And they do bring a bit of complexity, as ants can be separated by their food preferences; sugars, proteins, fats, or mixes of such. So, it's helpful to match to type of bait to the type of ant.

put some sugar syrup, dead insects, and peanut butter out on test pieces of aluminum foil and see what they eat, then match the bait to the feeding preference.

I was just thinking about ewrkk's suggestion about repellants. Paper wasps paint a plant-resin based ant deterrent around the petiole (base) of their nests. So, i'm thinking of propolis, i wonder if it has ant repellant properties? Make an extract and slather it in a paste around the base of hive stands? hmm...
 
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