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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have had an aweful flow this year. I have several hives with backfill rd deeps. Most years this happens so I extract the deep frames. Extracting deep frames is a real pia. It's old comb with hard cappings and is something I'd like to avoid. I have an idea and would like opinions from the seasoned members please. My idea is to remove the deep frames and leave them out for the bees to rob out. I open feed anyway and the area that I use is far enough away that I don't start a robbing problem which is a **** horrible thing to deal with. If I leave the spaces empty, where the honey frames came from I'm wondering if they will store it in the medium supers I use for honey boxes.
Any thoughts on this idea?
Thanks
 

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Consider putting the deeps on the bottom board and taking a capping scratcher to them. Then put a queen excluder on top of the deep and stack your brood box/s on top and super on top. The bees are hardwired to move that honey above the broodnest but there will be a lot of utilization of it for brood rearing. You would still lose less of it that setting it out in the open to share with the neighbors. Be sure to have an entrance to let the drones out or they will plug the excluder.
 

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One of our club members places the deep frames on top of the inner cover (just lay them flat one at a time) and then a feeding shim and a lid. Bees come through inner cover hole and nicely clean the frame while storing it right below in the honey supers. Really no different than feeding via top feeders. Be mindful that if you leave an empty space in the brood chamber where you took the frame off, they may build cross comb there. Better give them an empty frame there (even medium).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Where does the queen go? Above or below the exclude? Thanks
 

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I'm assuming the reason you want it in the supers is because you'd like to extract it at some point anyways. All of that sounds like more work, more hassle, and more being sticky than just extracting them in the first place. The lengths we go to to avoid going to lengths… :scratch: While I admit that I'm guilty of doing that too, I'm just wondering if all this isn't just more hassle for you. Plus, bees on the honey moving job are not bees on the nectar gathering job.
 

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Most of the frames I pulled as excess stores are too crystallized to extract. I set up a hive this afternoon on Vance G's style. I have had the frames out for open feed for a few days but they have only been toying with them.

I dont think frames of crystalized honey are good for winter stores either. They just seem wasted space. I really would like to have them cleared as drawn brood comb.

This has been somewhat of an issue for me every year. Guess I will just have to throw some caution to the wind and not feed them up quite so heavy for winter.
 

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Most of the frames I pulled as excess stores are too crystallized to extract. I set up a hive this afternoon on Vance G's style. I have had the frames out for open feed for a few days but they have only been toying with them.

I dont think frames of crystalized honey are good for winter stores either. They just seem wasted space. I really would like to have them cleared as drawn brood comb.

This has been somewhat of an issue for me every year. Guess I will just have to throw some caution to the wind and not feed them up quite so heavy for winter.
Uncap.
Spray with water heavily.
Give to the bees.
They will clean it all up.

Since I have long hives I have it easy - I insert such frames beyond the follower board and spread them wide.
They get cleaned in no time.
Problem solved.
 

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One of our club members places the deep frames on top of the inner cover (just lay them flat one at a time) and then a feeding shim and a lid. Bees come through inner cover hole and nicely clean the frame while storing it right below in the honey supers. Really no different than feeding via top feeders. Be mindful that if you leave an empty space in the brood chamber where you took the frame off, they may build cross comb there. Better give them an empty frame there (even medium).
I think the trick is is laying them flat. I hung a frame in a box over the inner cover, and I am pretty sure they started filling/capping it instead of emptying it. But it does work.
 

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" This has been somewhat of an issue for me every year. Guess I will just have to throw some caution to the wind and not feed them up quite so heavy for winter.
Frank "

So it sounds like this isn't honey but crystallized sugar syrup.
Why would you want to transfer this to your honey supers?
Maybe it would be best to store in the freezer and feed back in the fall after your last harvest.
 

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I have one colony that already has a fair bit of sugar syrup in the supers. I was planning to extract everything from that for my own cooking use so just threw another super on it and the uncapped sugar syrup frames under neath the brood box.

I am concerned about how well the bees will handle crystallized sugar syrup for winter feed. What is your experience? I have seen them work it in the spring by sucking out the liquid and carrying out the crystals or dumping them to the bottom board; spring yes, winter---?

The colony got a lot of attention from other bees afterward. I sealed up the bottom entrance into the deep with the decapped frames and reduced entrance to the brood box which is now in the middle of the stack. It caused a lot of confusion: only a few dead bees on the ground but for sure it is not something I would do if your bees are prone to robbing and certainly not with a screened bottom board.

6:30 this morning there was still a fair bit of bearding. Will keep an eye on them and may have to take that deep with 8 frames of hunni in it and put it away from the hives to empty out. Dont want it in the bee yard and dont want it out where the bears can get a taste for honey either.
 

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I am lazier than Vance G. Scrape open, then place the whole box on TOP over an innercover. I would NOT suggest open feeding.

Crazy Roland
 

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I am lazier than Vance G. Scrape open, then place the whole box on TOP over an innercover. I would NOT suggest open feeding.

Crazy Roland
I had the same problem as Titus142 with this approach- they use it to store new nectar instead of clearing them, inner cover between the supers don't bother them in summer- they still treat them as their own space.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Uncap.
Spray with water heavily.
Give to the bees.
They will clean it all up.

Since I have long hives I have it easy - I insert such frames beyond the follower board and spread them wide.
They get cleaned in no time.
Problem solved.
Have you done this yourself? What does spraying with water do?

Fwiw I use top entrance and no inner cover. If I used an inner cover for this specific issue what's to keep the bees from carrying the honey below the supers and into the hive bodies?
 

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Have you done this yourself? What does spraying with water do?

Fwiw I use top entrance and no inner cover. If I used an inner cover for this specific issue what's to keep the bees from carrying the honey below the supers and into the hive bodies?
If they have a brood nest there with actively laying queen, they will not move much there, only for immediate consumption, if they are backfilling the brood nest for whatever reason, there is nothing you can do to stop them...
 

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Have you done this yourself? What does spraying with water do?

Fwiw I use top entrance and no inner cover. If I used an inner cover for this specific issue what's to keep the bees from carrying the honey below the supers and into the hive bodies?
I do this routinely with the last year's frames with honey crystallized to various degrees.
Bees need water to dissolve crystallized honey.
As well as the water itself dissolves thick honey/honey crystals (basically, turns in to syrup).

Usually I do this when feeding weak colonies (nucs), you don't want them exerting themselves to bring water from outside so to dissolve thick honey.
But also I can stick such frames into strong colonies when I need them cleaned quickly - they will clean them up quickly.

If possible, check every 1-2 days if can and spray more water onto frames.

Sure - use your inner-cover so that the frames are "outside" of the hive.
This will be similar to using a follower board.
Should work the same.
 
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