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Ventured out a little into this this season here locally. The weather was pretty strange here so I didn’t get into it as much as I would have liked but now I have questions.
How do you answer people who want a certain breed of queens? Most seem turned away when I tell them my queens are mutts that are grafted/cut from my best performing hives. They are wanting Italian/Carnolian name but I don’t feel right telling them one or the other. I have bought both breeds and even some Russians and Bee Weaver queens but I haven’t made queens from anything that doesn’t survive till the next spring in my yard. I’m not looking to produce and sell 100’s of queens. I try to grow my own operation using daughters of the best hives and just want to sell the extra, I really don’t care what breed or color they are.

What if any backing do you give a mated queen? I haven’t had any issues but I also don’t mail them and put the freshly caged queen in their hands. Is it my problem if she turns into a drone layer a few weeks later? I usually pulled queens that had been laying for a few weeks to prevent this.

Want to try to mate and sell more queens next year depending on hive losses next spring. I finally got enough hives to start/support this in the scale I want I believe this year. Or at least about as many production colonies that I want to handle so I can turn nucs into resource hives instead of growing them out.
 

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Thing with "mutts", is they are crossbreds. So they will often show hybrid vigor, but that dissipates in a few generations.

Crossbreds contain a hotchpotch of genetics and the offspring may be very different to the parents. People buying queens are usually doing so because they want to improve their genetics, or change from one breed, to another. Buying "mutts" is not what many, or most people buying queens, are after.

Some professional breeders are selling crossbreds, but they are usually people who have developed a particular line that is now stable, and they can make particular claims about their bees.

However a small beekeeper selling a few queens and claiming they are "mutts" is going to be perceived as not being able to offer much of any value.

If you do want to sell queens, a good plan would be to get a breeder from some reputable source, preferably a purebred, and advertise them as such.
 

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if you are selling mated queens folks are assuming you have a mating yard where good mating conditions are met and your queens will not become drone layers. Yes i think you are responsible to replace any queen which becomes a drone layer in her first year.
 

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or say they are the granddaughter of a bee weaver , mated to locally adapted survivors.
Or ask what the "majority" are looking for then get a pure bread as suggested by OT and say daughters of a XXX mated with local adapted survivors.


GG
 

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or say they are the granddaughter of a bee weaver , mated to locally adapted survivors.
Or ask what the "majority" are looking for then get a pure bread as suggested by OT and say daughters of a XXX mated with local adapted survivors.
GG
Or ... "F1 XXX's - open mated" - I've often seen this description used by people selling first generation mutts. (BTW - mutts I have no problem with)
LJ
 

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That has a good ring to it :thumbsup:.
 

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"local queens that are the product of X years of hand selection for survival and performance in our area"
I usually go in the history of the line IE this years spiels run something like

"My local breeder this year comes from a hive that started as a swarm I caught in 2016 so they have survived 5 winters locally They haven't swarmed that I am aware of and I never re queened them, but I am sure they have taken care of that them self's.. The daughters I grafted off her last year over wintered well as 4x4 nucs with 25% losses and came in to spring strong .
This is the kinda of performance I am looking for, bees that winter well and take care of them selfs. "

"This years guest breeder was brought in to start integrating VSH in to my stock, She is a F-2 off a VP queens VSH Carolinian (Spartan line) Instrumental Inseminated breeder out crossed with Sam Comforts Survivor stock, her mother survived 2 winters in up state NY with out treatments"

Sounds a lot better then "I am grafting off my local mutts and a NY mutt" :lpf::lpf:

live stock comes with a tail light guarantee except for drone layers. If a queen doesn't lay worker brood thats my fault not theirs
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Coalsmok's Best Maysel Queens. :)
I like this lol.

Just trying to be honest with what they are getting and don’t like to sell anything that hasn’t laid for at least a cycle to check for drone layer.

I understand most are afraid mutts means just any laying queen from my yard. I guess I need to start explaining that they are from my longest lived queens that come through winter strong. The queen I grafted from this year and her daughter hives are the first out working on the cooler days and have been my best producers.
 
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