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Discussion Starter #1
We recently had some tornado activity forecasted for our area and felt the need to secure a couple of our particularly tall hives. My dad came up with this method using a T-post, Simpson tie (avail at building supply stores) and a piece of angle iron.
Hopefully the pictures are self explanatory but a few details...

  • Drill hole in T-post and piece of angle iron for nut and bolt
    Drill hole in angle iron for Simpson tie
    Drill a slot (couple holes and file between) in Simpson tie
    Hammer T-post into ground
    Attach angle iron to T-post
    Attach Simpson tie to hive
    Attach Simpson tie to angle iron

91FAF181-5C86-4841-976F-B1A9B05F445A.jpeg
FB677AEB-1F2F-4D31-9FFD-A6DE8E0A0E37.jpeg
 

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That is a good setup. I would suggest adding a ratchet strap to turn the whole thing into one monolithic unit. Right now, you are relying on the weight of the hive boxes and propolis to keep everything together, especially the top cover. If the top cover goes, then rain can get in, and wet bees=dead bees.
 

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Nice setup I might have to try this. Last fall I had a 4 story nuc setup fall over in a high wind. Should have had it braced better. Live and learn.
 

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Last year I put a large hook on the fence next to my tall hive and then ratchet strapped a piece of PVC pipe to a upper box to keep it in place. I could then lift the box off of the hook or remove the strap to do an inspection. This seemed to work pretty well.

Using a ratchet strap/easy disconnect to attach to the T post means you dont have to take a drill/more tools out with you for an inspection.
 

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One of the advantages of a square hive is the extra stability. I calculated it as taking 42% stronger wind to tilt a hive over. Tornado force wind would still toss them around, but ordinary wind won't. It takes less total boxes for a given amount of honey storage as well. They don't get as tall as 8 frame or 10 frame equipment.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Last year I put a large hook on the fence next to my tall hive and then ratchet strapped a piece of PVC pipe to a upper box to keep it in place. I could then lift the box off of the hook or remove the strap to do an inspection. This seemed to work pretty well.

Using a ratchet strap/easy disconnect to attach to the T post means you dont have to take a drill/more tools out with you for an inspection.
Having to use a drill or other tools for inspections would indeed be a hassle. In our setup we use a wing nut to avoid tools. The Simpson tie is attached to hive box with screws (drill) but the Simpson tie is attached to the angle iron with a wing nut.
 

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Having to use a drill or other tools for inspections would indeed be a hassle. In our setup we use a wing nut to avoid tools. The Simpson tie is attached to hive box with screws (drill) but the Simpson tie is attached to the angle iron with a wing nut.
I missed that, that is an easy solution
 
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