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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering about options for securing a hive that will be in a publicly accessible area on the campus of a University.

My only real concern is someone toppling the hive just for kicks.

At first I have been thinking of using some type of ratchet strap set up somewhat like how I recall the hives were set up at the White House, but I figure it wouldn't be that hard for someone to loosen a standard ratchet strap if they have ever used one before. That might slow them down, and maybe that is enough, but I am thinking there must be a better solution (maybe they make a locking ratchet strap, I will google that).

One would hope that the University kids might just leave a couple hives alone, but I could see where it might just be risking temptation to not secure them in some manner. I thought of advertising that the hives are being monitored by camera, but these might be kept on a prairie and it would be difficult to set up anything other than a trail cam and that wouldn't work too well given all the foot traffic that this prairie sees.

As an educational tool I wouldn't want them to be entirely caged in - might try to promote a split rail fence just to keep people at a distance with an educational sign.

Trying to think about how to advise the group that is looking for my help in starting a couple hives on campus.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Answering my own question, I see they do make lockable ratchet straps, that is probably just the ticket. I have ratcheted down many hives to either secure them or move them, so I know that works quite well.
 

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As a former university police officer I would have more concern over guests and visitors to the university rather than the students. I'd like to think the faculty, staff and students would take pride in the hives, especially if they were painted school colors. Most of the problems we dealt with were from visitors for events such as dances, gaming fests, Quinceanera dances, and bored high school kids prowling the campus. Even our rowdy hockey team players would not have messed with hives on campus. Use ratchet straps, and ask the campus police to keep an eye on them. The police may very well view the hives as a risk area that needs frequent patrolling which is how I would have viewed it as well.
 

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I had 5 hives stacked out with capped honey at a university and I do think one of the dorm janitors robbed the honey and brought the wet supers back. I sure was bummed out over it.
 

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I'm not sure what level of security you're looking for, but the nylon ratchet strap (locking or otherwise) can be easily unfastened with a pocket knife. I'm not sure what your background is, or where exactly in WI you're at, but I know very few people that walk around without at least a small pocket knife. Though nothing is going to stop a determined tamperer, and securing cable with a locked turnbuckle would provide a little more protection from the casual thug with a knife.
 

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Just put the ratchet at the hive entrance.
Lol, I like this idea. But yeah, a knife would fix it quick.

What are the hives sitting on? What about screwing the hive body to the bottom, and attaching it to the stand somehow? It would be a little more difficult, but you don't have to move the bottom box very often. You could even use something like this and short screws and attach the front of each box to the one below. Not many people would be determined enough to stand in front of the the hive and unscrew it, but for a bee keeper, removing two screws for each box wouldn't be that big of a deal.

It wouldn't look like you were trying, which wouldn't make it a challenge to any fool that wants to try. Putting up a camera would just be one more thing they would try to mess with.
 

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A can of bug spray will not be deterred by a locking ratchet strap.
Throwing rocks at them will have them good and pissy when you want to work them also.

Sounds like you need to find a more secure location.
 

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I have a sign stating "Danger: Bees will attack!" on one of my yards in a publicly accessible place. Most people just turn and go the other way.
 

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Yeah - I see your point. These particular bees are in a place people should not go to though. If they are, they are probably up to no good.
 

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Screw anchors in the ground, metal stap screwed into bottom box. thin plywood screwed over seam between boxes. Top cover screwed into the top box. Large sign "BEWARE, APIS MELLIFER PRESENT
 

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Buy a box of surplus "minefield" signs?

In all seriousness, can you put a reasonably high fence around it?
 
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