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Bjorn brought up the subject in another post that some of these questions are easily answered by simply reading a basic book on beekeeping. Some things, like the life cycle of a bee, should be at your fingertips from books etc. I really don't mind answering questions, but often I just do a search of this board or a search of the Internet for answers to simple questions. It probably would save some of us a lot of time if you would check a basic book or do a search on this site or do a search on the Internet first before asking questions. Then if you still have a question about the details of the subject we can help.

It is simple to do a search on this site. There is a search choice when you are in "The Exchange" and one on the opening page. Both will search the topics here and the one on the main page will also search the rest of the board. Most questions have already been discussed on this board and it is redundant to try to explain it again.

Certainly after reading everything available on a subject it is still often confusing because the writers skip some of the details of execution. Some of those details can make a huge difference. Feel free to ask questions, but you may save us some work if you try to find the answers first. And you can get some satisfaction by learning how to find your own answers.
 

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Thank-you for addressing this. The basics to me is when I hear questions/statements asked like:

I think I have a queen.....
I'm not sure what the queen looks like...
It may be a queen but maybe a drone....
I think there are eggs....
etc.......

It just seems to send chills when some questions when asked, should be known. You wonder if any planning, reading, knowledge collecting, has been obtained prior to dumping a package in a hive. I thought when I started "How hard can it be?" After reading and rereading many books, attending seminars, asking many questions of experienced beekeepers, I am still learning. And after all this, I realize that little mistakes can make a difference on being successful or losing a hive.

I think a site like this is great but having a book to read is essential. Some are listed on this site.
 

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Sometimes its nice for us new guys to have someone to talk to that actually has bees, just to reaffirm what we see or think we see and to advise when things dont go quite according to the book. I guess nothing surpasses a good teacher in person but you guys are the closest I have. I didnt know how to search this site so I will use that from now on before I ask basic questions. That will help a lot.
 

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Now, come on guys, don't be so hard on those of us who are not experts. That's the reason for a Beekeeping 101 forum, I would think. Besides, there are some people who just like exchange of information between themselves and others rather than reading. New beekeepers aren't trying to pain in the a**, but need some moral support, especially if there is not a mentor available to them, which I suspect is a common problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don't mind the moral support at all. I don't mind the questions. But often it's just a rehash of the questions that was gone over a week ago. A search will save a lot of retyping. Please don't take this as complaining about questions. I realize the details of things are often left out of the books. They (and the rest of us) often make basic statements that leave out details of execution that are necessary to success. Often some general statement in a book is not clear enough to reassure a new beekeeper that things are ok. Please feel free to ask questions. Also feel free to search the site and read what's already been said on the subject.
 

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I knew someone was going to take it the wrong way. I love talking about bees, I love helping people, and I also love a good debate.
My only point is this, and take it or not: When you hear people say things like "I'm not sure if I saw the queen or not", "I THINK she's laying eggs", "Maybe it was drone, I'm not sure", etc, etc, etc,. If as a beekeeper you have a problem between queens and drones, have never seen eggs, etc, GET HELP. Hands on is best.

I am not a formost authority on anything except the pimple on my *** , but if your going to keep bees, please seek a good book and READ it. More than once is helpful. Seek a mentor or another beekeeper to feed off of. And by no means stop asking questions. And remember there is something called constructive critizism.
 

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I'm so sorry, and I didn't mean to sound so defensive. It's just that new beekeepers are so enthused that they want to talk about it and share. I honestly think that lots of people know the answers to their simple questions, but they want to have discussion with someone else who has common interests. It's not exactly everyday that you come across another beekeeper on the job or in the supermarket. Some of us are rather private people and don't ask questions unless we really feel we can't solve our own problems, and others like to chat. It's probably annoying to feel like you're dealing with first-graders, but appreciate the enthusiasm. We usually tend to get over it in about a year's time. Next year, maybe this year's newbies can answer some of those simple questions.
 

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i think this site is great for prebeginners and experts,and every thing in between.i have found that it lacks a good way to reference things other than looking at titles,which aren't always an accurate description of what has been discussed on the forum.i do agree strongly that all beginners need to read at least one book or even watch a good bee video a few times,the basics aren't that hard.
 

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(edited May 03, 2003).]

[This message has been edited by alleyyooper (edited May 19, 2003).]
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm not complaining about answering questions. I am suggesting that a lot of questions have already been answered.

I wouldn't search by title. I wouldn't even search only the obvious subject area because I see that often a subject is discussed somewhere unrelated. For example you'll see a discussion of something like wiring foundation in the cell calls area. But if you look up something, such as wiring foundation as "wire" and "foundation" in all areas. You'll find much discussion that you probably won't get by asking the question again because a lot of people may feel they have already shared their view of that subject. And recently at that.

Also some questions really require paragrpahs of explainations to adequately explain it to a newcomer and it gets old trying to say it all again. I've described remove bees from walls numerous times and often leave out a lot of it because it seems redudant or it takes too long to think how to explain it all again. I've described moving hives 100 feet or so many times and although the basics are simple enough, the details are quite lengthy.

I wouldn't answer so many questions if I didn't like doing it.
 

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I'll start out by saying the same thing as last time. Don't stop asking questions. Even basics.

My original point had to do with knowing that some new beekeepers had a problem identifying queens from drone, saying they "think" there are eggs etc. They ask what to do in certain instances and it is extremely hard to answer questions and be helpful when there is a doubt as to the answers as to queens present, eggs present, etc.

Did some of these people ever take a beginners course?
Did they ever open a hive with any other beekeeper?
Have they READ a book on beekeeping?
Did they ever seek any hands-on experience?
Have they asked someone to stop by?

I would say that many if not all the questions above are answered by "no", by some.

I want to helpful and participate all I can and that is why I hope that beekeepers seek all avenues to seek knowledge. Not one person ever said to stop asking questions
 

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Alleyyooper- thanks for the link to the garden site. I love gardening and enjoy learning from other gardeners how they problem-solve. I may even be able to contribute, as I know much more about gardening than I do about beekeeping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
To explain a little better Bjorn's point. The quality of advice the more experienced of us can give is directly proportional to the quality of information you can give us. If you ask a question assuming that what you saw was the queen when it was a drone or what you saw was capped worker brood when it was drone brood, or what you saw was drone brood when it was honey, then the answers you get will not be any more valid than the mistaken information they were based on.

Bjorn was making the point that you need to read books, look at pictures and try to have a grasp of the basics and what you are talking about in order to ask good questions and get good answers.

No one is saying you shouldn't be asking questions!
 

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Greetings . . . To Michael Bush and others who make this site possible:

P.L.E.A.S.E dont stop answering our questions!

The frequently asked question (FAQ) are not being asked by the same person(s) over-and-over. Each "NewBee" has many of the SAME questions. They may be reading the same book. But, all lack what each of YOU have; EXPERIENCE.

May I offer these thoughts:

* Make "How-to-search" available upon sign-on.
* Add "key-words" to each reply so that future searches will 'tag' correct replies.
* Take-a-break; We value your input, but you dont have to answer EACH question. Maybe just a watchful eye to make sure the question GETS answered (correctly).
* Make more Point-of-Views available. This would be a great way to answer repeated questions ONE TIME and be able to refer "NewBees" to that work.
* Some questions are just "chat". Let those questions answer themselves.

I would like to sincerly say to all,
THANK YOU.

Dave W
 

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DELETED(edited May 19, 2003).]

[This message has been edited by alleyyooper (edited May 19, 2003).]
 

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I think what Michael said was not taken in the way he meant it by some. He has posted 1610 times and I be 1500 of those were answering questions from greenhorns like me. Lets give him and Bjorn a break and thank them for all the help.
 

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I agree with GalvestonCo. I think Mike is doing yeoman work and that he has no desire to squelch anyone's questions, he's just saying that it may be beneficial for all to do a search in the archives first. This is an excellent suggestion, to my way of thinking, as the questioner will find a great wealth of answers to that very question, probably more than will appear hear in the chat column. He's not saying "Don't ask", he's saying "You might get a better answer by looking in the archives first, and then if you are still not satisfied, come here and we'll fix it". I had my start with bees 20 years ago, and still think of myself as a beginner. And you will see questions here from me, but I go to the archives, too.
Cheers, Joel
 

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I just found these boards today, and had the misfortune to run across this thread.

I see this thread or its close cousin on every board I go to (alot of em), about a million different subjects.

I think it is the nature of the beast (and human nature to boot) to have the same questions asked over and over again-resulting in the same comment from some, over and over again.

As a newcomer to bees I found the following comments -*regardless of the intent of the author*- to make me feel like I shouldn't even ask questions until I was a seasoned pro.

-*snip*-
Did some of these people ever take a beginners course?
Did they ever open a hive with any other beekeeper?
Have they READ a book on beekeeping?
Did they ever seek any hands-on experience?
Have they asked someone to stop by?
-*snip*-

You know some folks need more hand holding than others... and if you don't want to do it fine!

But comments like this tend to make us think twice about asking those dumb questions like what I came here about (washboarding).

Just my opinionated ramblings.



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Chuck
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