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I use top feeder that hold about 2 gallons of sugar water. I have purchase most of them from Brushy Mountain and they do not leak. I have purchased 3 from Dadant and they seep through the corners and become moldy and also the wood is deteriorating. Since the bees directly consume the liquid in the feeders I am looks for a safe product to prevent leaking and seepage along the joints of the feeders. I would like to seal these feeders this summer before I feed in the fall so would appreciate any suggestions for a product.
As a side note the feeders from Brushy Mountain need to be redesigned as they drown many bees where as the feeders from Dandant are much better in this respect. In fact they both need improvement... Too bad these companies don't experiment with their own products. I will contact both companies when time permits.
 

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A paraffin dip seals them, that's if you have the technology available.
 

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I've had great success with the polystyrene hive top feeders from BetterBee, they're molded into one piece of styrofoam so there's no leaking. To minimize drowning I pop a piece of screen in between the plastic guard and the wall the bees climb down to get to the sugar water. Paint the outside of the feeders and they'll last you a good while.
 

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The 2 gallon feeders we bought are not Brushy Mountain, but other than that I don't know the brand. They were wood with silicone sealant on the joints. The silicone annoys the bees, who chew on it.

We sealed ours with CamCote food-grade epoxy-ester sealant from Brushy Mountain.

http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com/Camcote-1qt/productinfo/615/

I was surprised how much residual odor was present after coating. I'd give it three weeks to cure before introducing it to the hives. That was the one good thing about our bees arriving late. But the bees took to the syrup quickly and are doing well, so I'm pretty sure it was not harmful, and the wood is holding up nicely.

The bee access area on ours was covered with stapled-down screen, that did not allow access for cleaning and did allow bees to get into the reservoir when empty. We pulled off the stapled screen and I bent up a custom piece that can be removed, blocks access to the the main reservoir, and also covers some vent holes I drilled at the front. It seems to work well. We've had three bees drown out of two hives, probably due to filling too fast and catching them at the bottom with a tidal wave of syrup. Fill s...l...o...w...l...y.
 

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i like the solid plastic feeder that mann lake has. It has a open top that I guess you use a inner cover with to keep bees out. I staple 1/8 hardware screen over mine. The plastic top feed holds 2 gal. and it is framed in wood.
 

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I also sealed mine with melted beeswax in the corners and joints.

Throw in a handful or two of straw or whatever, and you will fix your drowning problem.

If it's getting moldy, you might be using too much, letting it sit too long, or using too thin mixture of syrup. Try using 5:3, which is what I use year round. I have never had it mold on me.
 

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Make your own like this...

View attachment 11213

Very few if any drown bees and you don't have to worry about leaks either.
I use these myself. look on Youtube for FATBEEMAN no leak feeder. The bees use a chute and ladder to access the syrup and i havent had one drown. When ya open it up, all the bees are enclosed so they're not flying up in your face or getting into the syrup while your trying to refill.
 
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