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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a custom made stainless steel honey tank and I want to seal the seams where they were welded with something, just to make it easier for cleaning and to prevent leaks. What do the different companies use on their equipment , Like my Maxant 1400 extractor ?
It is almost an amber colored sealant.

Thanks
Ben
 

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Ben do a google on thread lockers or anaerobic weld sealants. It will probably take some heat to drive the honey etc. out of the pores in the welds, then the sealant will wick in and set up. Sadly the best thing for porosity is to not create it. When stainless goes well it is beautiful; when it does not, it can be a mess.
 

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Brushy Mountain carries a CamCote product, an amber-clear epoxy-ester coating which is food grade. I've used it to seal up wooden top feeders, and even used it for the exterior finish on an observation hive (I had plenty left) but they say it is just the thing for sealing leaky extractors.

"Camcote is a food approved clear coating for any surface that touches honey. Should your old galvanized extractor, honey tank, or buckets have rust or corrosion this is the product designed to fix that and make all your equipment look new. You must first clean all surfaces from dirt, dust and grease. Sanding may be required. Can be applied with a brush and surfaces not previously painted should be given two coats. One quart will cover 300 to 400 square feet."

http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com/Camcote-1qt/productinfo/615/

My observation: don't use it if you are in a hurry. It is like a varnish ... takes a day or two to set up and then will smell like fresh finish for a week or two. If still green, it might leave a trace of odor in honey. Should be safe, but I wish it set odorless faster.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I think I will just fill it up with water and check for leaks , I think it is fine, I just wanted to finish it off in case I had a small seam not closed off with weld.
Thanks for all the information, I might look into the Camcote
 

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I ordered food grade silicone caulk for a leaky tank and then later read that locally available silicone caulks are also food grade and used for fish tanks.
 

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If it doesnt leak water it wont leak honey. Much easier to do any sealing required if there is not already honey in the voids.
 

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No secrets, I could tell you what we use, but it won't do anyone any good, as the application method is tricky.
The tank itself must be heated to 450-500 degrees and the "product" is applied through a gun at 300 degrees
This is done so that it may properly cure and adhere/seal.
We use it only to keep honey from getting in the seams of our tanks, thats all. Doesn't serve any structural purpose
as we weld the entire bottom 360!
 

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Something to consider, before you fill that void with epoxy or silicone... once it's on there you will never be able to fully remove it. If you want to weld to the tank, say to add a new fitting or change the location of a drain, good luck getting the metal in the area clean.
 

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No secrets, I could tell you what we use, but it won't do anyone any good, as the application method is tricky.
The tank itself must be heated to 450-500 degrees and the "product" is applied through a gun at 300 degrees
This is done so that it may properly cure and adhere/seal.
We use it only to keep honey from getting in the seams of our tanks, thats all. Doesn't serve any structural purpose
as we weld the entire bottom 360!
Do they weld the outside or inside I am just wondering I have been working in the food industry for a while as a mechanic/stainless fabricator and our QA would nit pick every little weld
 

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We all weld them all on the outside, I don't even know how you could weld the inside, tight space!
Do they weld the outside or inside I am just wondering I have been working in the food industry for a while as a mechanic/stainless fabricator and our QA would nit pick every little weld
 

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We all weld them all on the outside, I don't even know how you could weld the inside, tight space!
Yeah I know what you mean I have a micro tig torch with some goofy bent tungsten for the real hard welds at home. I also use a product called solar flux you mix it with alcohol and you can paste it on the back side of a weld and it will keep it from sugaring
 

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Ben,
If you feel you need to seal it, talk to the people who sell sealants for cisterns and the like, the companies that make them generally have a food safe epoxy for Stainless. We used it in commercial kitchen construction. I forget all the different brands but it was all very similar. If later you need to repair something it can be burnt off but the fumes are horrible.
Regards
 

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Ben - follow the above advise, then get a new fabricator. I also weld 304L, and there should be no crevices for matter to stick in. Weld, grind, polish. Rinse and repeat until "proper". Yes, it takes more time(money), but makes cleanup alot easier.

Crazy Roland
 
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