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This may fall into the "micro-management" catagory, but curiosity is getting the best of me.

I was burning/scorching out some old deeps yesterday, and had wondered if I was somehow defeating the purpose of using these boxes as swarm traps. I imagine that bees throughout time have used lightening/fire damaged trees for homes. But perhaps they were older cavities that had no "smoke/fire" smell or residue after a certain timeframe has passed.

Would bees ignore a recent (a few months) box that had been scorched. I know they do not like smoke, and so could this be a deterrant for use? Am I lessening the likelyhood that they would use this site?

I will use some pheromone lure or old comb as always.

Is there any studies, thoughts or comments?

Thank you.
 

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May ask Jim Fischer, many old bee-liners used to burn a pot of wax and honey to attract bees.

I agree with that idea because before a solar melter, I used a heat gun used for striping paint and the slum sometimes would flame if not submerged in enough wax. It seemed whenever I would start this ritual, and enough smoke has been generated, I'd get a bunch of bees joining me in the garage. Keep in mind however, your scorching should remove all traces of wax/debris.

Your scorching might even lure bees to your old boxes. I'd try it for kicks.

-Jeff
 

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It should help more than hurt because the scorching will make the trap smelly enough that the bees will easily find it. A swarm can only take up residence in a site they can find. Southern exposure, a decent height in the air, an entrance hole 4" up from the bottom and no light coming in the top are also factors to consider. A good experiment would be to put two traps next to each other, one scorched, one new wood, and otherwise identicle. Best of luck, Paul.
 
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