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Was watching YouTube and saw a video showing a guy in Tennessee using pex pipe as entrances the concept is that because of the shb hard odd shaped body and the fact that they can’t hover they can’t get into the hive because they fall off the edge of the tubes was wondering what you all thought about the concept? The video is below

https://youtu.be/63vHTL6gcy4
 

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Was watching YouTube and saw a video showing a guy in Tennessee using pex pipe as entrances the concept is that because of the shb hard odd shaped body and the fact that they can’t hover they can’t get into the hive because they fall off the edge of the tubes was wondering what you all thought about the concept? The video is below

https://youtu.be/63vHTL6gcy4
I was wondering the same, and I have been watching various videos regarding methods to discourage SHB. Last year I made 3 bottom boards with a sort of special "beetle barrier" that worked very well, but they are finicky to build. This year I have one with a "vertical entrance" that requires the bees to hover to get in, with a metal rim that should prevent the little hard-shelled critters from crawling around it. I figure if the bees don't mind, and I keep the other cracks around the hive like between boxes blocked off (like another posted advised me, thanks) then it may work well. But, only time will tell I guess, and if it works for one it may not work for all. If you do make some, please keep us posted, preferably with some kind of pictures, so we can all see the results. Thanks!
 

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Definitely will plan on making some this weekend do you have any pics of your entrances or examples it sounds interesting!?
 

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I was wondering the same, and I have been watching various videos regarding methods to discourage SHB. Last year I made 3 bottom boards with a sort of special "beetle barrier" that worked very well, but they are finicky to build. This year I have one with a "vertical entrance" that requires the bees to hover to get in, with a metal rim that should prevent the little hard-shelled critters from crawling around it. I figure if the bees don't mind, and I keep the other cracks around the hive like between boxes blocked off (like another posted advised me, thanks) then it may work well. But, only time will tell I guess, and if it works for one it may not work for all. If you do make some, please keep us posted, preferably with some kind of pictures, so we can all see the results. Thanks!

Definitely will plan on making some this weekend do you have any pics of your entrances or examples it sounds interesting!?
 

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I don't see where he says it helps with SHB. He says the purpose is to help them guard the hive and I don't really see how it is any better than a reduced entrance or robber screen. What am I missing?
 

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I don't see where he says it helps with SHB. He says the purpose is to help them guard the hive and I don't really see how it is any better than a reduced entrance or robber screen. What am I missing?
I didn't mark the time in the video, but he mentions that the whole intent is to make it such that the beetles can't just land on the board like jumbo jets and scurry right into the hive. Several folks have noted their observation that SHB supposedly can't hover upward, so since this design requires hovering to enter, it resist beetle. Several other people have mentioned success using a PVC "snorkel" that was sharpened on the edges, so the hard-shelled beetles can't just land on the side of the hive and walk down the snout and turn-the-corner rand walk right in. Presumably if their shells are hard (and their legs are small enough), then they can't "bend" in the middle to make it around the end of the snorkel, and they'll fall off. He even made his from red plastic, and the folks that make the "Guardian" entrance blocker claim that beetles don't like red for some reason either.

Here is a quick section view of the design I am trying, it's 80% on the bench right now. There is another post about "vertical hive entrance" in the same forum that discusses it. It seems the consensus is that hive beetles are like squirrels, they're going to find SOME way to get in eventually, so it'll take a strong hive to resist them anyways. Ultimately personal experience for you will be the best educator for what works for your bees in your location specifically. I figure if I can keep MOST of the stupid squirrels out, it should be easier for the bees to kick out the few that make it inside. Too bad they don't bite through their shells before they discard their lifeless husks outside the hives...

200317 Vertical entrance v1.jpg
 

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I didn't mark the time in the video, but he mentions that the whole intent is to make it such that the beetles can't just land on the board like jumbo jets and scurry right into the hive. Several folks have noted their observation that SHB supposedly can't hover upward, so since this design requires hovering to enter, it resist beetle. Several other people have mentioned success using a PVC "snorkel" that was sharpened on the edges, so the hard-shelled beetles can't just land on the side of the hive and walk down the snout and turn-the-corner rand walk right in. Presumably if their shells are hard (and their legs are small enough), then they can't "bend" in the middle to make it around the end of the snorkel, and they'll fall off. He even made his from red plastic, and the folks that make the "Guardian" entrance blocker claim that beetles don't like red for some reason either.

Here is a quick section view of the design I am trying, it's 80% on the bench right now. There is another post about "vertical hive entrance" in the same forum that discusses it. It seems the consensus is that hive beetles are like squirrels, they're going to find SOME way to get in eventually, so it'll take a strong hive to resist them anyways. Ultimately personal experience for you will be the best educator for what works for your bees in your location specifically. I figure if I can keep MOST of the stupid squirrels out, it should be easier for the bees to kick out the few that make it inside. Too bad they don't bite through their shells before they discard their lifeless husks outside the hives...

View attachment 54079
Love the design can’t wait to see it when it’s done will send pics of mine this weekend
 
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