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I searched this forum and found helpful posts regarding what to do with extra frames containing bee bread. I have about 12 of them in the freezer. From this year. I'd prefer they be free of bee bread, so will try an experiment. I will soak a few over night in a bucket of water and then hit them with a spray of water to blast what I hope to be soggy bee bread from the cells. Here are a couple examples of the frames I will be working on. Any thoughts on this?
 

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I searched this forum and found helpful posts regarding what to do with extra frames containing bee bread. ........Any thoughts on this?
I have been ranting for a long time on this forum - harvest it for human consumption (by scraping and beating out the bee bread granules).
Bee bread is a valuable human product.

Here is another way - use it as bee food.
Scrape and blend all this stuff (combs and all).
Add honey or sugar syrup to it.
It should become a goo (thick paste of sorts) where bee bread and honey and wax (as a filler) will be mixed.
Feed back to the bees as needed (place the goo patties onto the nucs or feed in spring).
You can do this now and refreeze for later use.
You can do it and use immediately (keep those frozen frames until spring).

People are tossing excellent bee and human food (then feeding the bees some sub-standard pollen patties often times).
Why?

I get it - those combs are valuable.
But then why did you freeze the combs with pollen anyway?
Most likely to somehow use later (that's why people freeze stuff).
 

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Bee Bread is already fermented. You dont want to add water however. Just take time to pick it out of there or get a clean handed teen to help you. They will have fun. Taste the bee bread making sure the taste is right. it whould have a semi sweet lemony flavor if fresh. Pretty sure you can freeze it in good packageing too. Bee careful not to consume it too late at night as it can give you so much energy you cant sleep.
 

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I like to put the bee bread frame in a super, the bees fill the last 1/3 with honey and seal, this in essence seals the bee bread in honey.
about 2 square inches a day is what I eat for general health.
pollen is supposed to have every know long and short chain amino acid.
pollen in general has a hard shell, fermentation breaks this shell down for better digestion.
it is very good food to blow down the drain with a pressured water blast.
but then you have the foundation back , so all is not lost.

funny we wash the bee bread down the drain and order a pizza.

may be some Zen in that if we think it thru long enough.

GG

BTW ham and pineapple on mine.....
 

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What a waste.
LJ
I agree. Bee bread is a very precious commodity. They say, for every cell of bee bread, nurse bees can raise one worker bee. I don't know if that's true, but consider the bees do need bee bread in order to raise more bees, and for the nourishment to produce royal jelly. They don't get their nutrition from nectar/honey alone. Without bee bread, we'd have to provide a supplement, all man made bee bread supplements are nutritionally lame, in comparison, not to mention expensive. Besides, as has also been mentioned it's nutritious for us human's too.
 

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What a waste.
LJ
It all depends.
I my area,we have plenty of pollen from March until frost in Oct and I end up with pollen bound frames that don't get eaten,
Yes,bees ferment pollen into bee bread for winter storage but I don't think it lasts forever.Every spring and summer the bees bring in fresh pollen and store it adjacent to the brood nest.This always gets used first.Excess pollen gets stored below the brood nest in the bottom box and when fresh pollen is available,the older bee bread is ignored.You can tell by the color.Newer bee bread is fresh and bright where older develops a grey/brown cast.

Has anyone seen any research on the nutritional value of bee bread stored in the hive for over one year?
 
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