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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, lovely bee people. I bought a nuc this weekend and think I chose poorly. At the bee yard, all the buyers were supposed to pick out the best nuc and take the ones we wanted. I'm very new to this and just walking close to them in a bee yard with almost 200 hives was really stressful. Let's be honest: there were tears. Anyway eventually I mustered the courage to take off a few tops and just chose the one with the most bees. I couldn't even bring myself to pull frames to look at them. Once I chose that nuc, the seller helped me find the queen and he marked her for me. I noticed when he was doing this that they had built a lot of burr comb, but I didn't say anything because I was so scared and just wanted to get out of there!

When I went to install the frames in my hive, I realized that quite a bit of that burr comb had brood in it. I pretty much have the equivalent of a frame full of brood there! Is there any way to rescue the pupae at this point? I put all the comb I scraped out into Tupperware and set that on the kitchen counter before heading back to work.
 

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What type of foundation are you using? Saving those small pieces may prove difficult to gather up and rubber band onto a frame of some sort. If you are going foundation-less in your hive, it would give you a bad template for them to build off of.

You mentioned that you scraped all the comb into a Tupperware and left it in the kitchen. Does this include the brood you are looking to save? If so, it is likely the brood has been chilled and could be dead already.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, guys. The comb I put in Tupperware did indeed include the stuff with brood in it so it's kaput.

If I may ask a followup question, the burr comb that I scraped off my other hive didn't have brood in it so I've just been sticking it in Tupperware to wait until I want to do something with the wax. Is there something I can do to this comb to save it? Should I freeze it to keep it from getting nasty?
 

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You are going to get a lot of comb over the course of this journey. I find that after awhile the virgin comb starts to dry out and flake apart and not worth keeping around. Personally, I take all the burr comb that is relatively empty and microwave it to melt it down. If its full of food, I leave it in the bottom of the hive for about a week and bees clean it out (mostly) - then melt it down. The pollen and nectar fall to the bottom and the wax floats on top after a few minutes. I then skim the wax off and put it in a container to harden back up. The rest is tossed out before it can attract ants.
 

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I throw burr comb on the ground, not worth the time and effort, let the girls rob out whatever is left. Last year i was short 1 frame and they pulled comb similar to you but much straight like in a top bar. Luckily all the eggs were layed within 1-2 days of eachother. I waited for it to hatch then cut it out.

If its mostly drone or honey I would pitch.
 

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Hi Christine,

At this point I wouldn't worry about the odd-ball comb. You can freeze it, if you like and then when you're ready to melt some wax, toss it in with the rest to process together.

Now, don't beat yourself up about your choice: your bees are obviously eager wax-makers and resourceful egg layers, so that augers well for them getting down to business in their new digs. So clever you to have picked out such a good hive! And don't fret if you're still have some trepidation around your bees. It took me about eight months to get over that. Newbies are often over-eager to peer into their hives (do inspections). I could hardly force myself to go touch the boxes, never mind open them up. What enabled me to finally get over myself was when I had to do vital caretaking tasks -winter prep and then winter feeding.

I hope you have as much fun with your bees as I had in my first summer last year.

Enj.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks again! I've actually come much further with the bees in the past two days than I did in the past three weeks. My local beekeeping club recommended that I contact a member to come help with another problem I'd been having with the package bees from before. She was so very helpful and just having her with me yesterday afternoon calmed me down so much that I was still calm today. I think I'm over the hump! Well, at least with the fear . . . I'm sure I'll be posting plenty of questions.
 

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Hello, lovely bee people. I bought a nuc this weekend and think I chose poorly. At the bee yard, all the buyers were supposed to pick out the best nuc and take the ones we wanted. I'm very new to this and just walking close to them in a bee yard with almost 200 hives was really stressful. Let's be honest: there were tears. Anyway eventually I mustered the courage to take off a few tops and just chose the one with the most bees. I couldn't even bring myself to pull frames to look at them. Once I chose that nuc, the seller helped me find the queen and he marked her for me. I noticed when he was doing this that they had built a lot of burr comb, but I didn't say anything because I was so scared and just wanted to get out of there!

When I went to install the frames in my hive, I realized that quite a bit of that burr comb had brood in it. I pretty much have the equivalent of a frame full of brood there! Is there any way to rescue the pupae at this point? I put all the comb I scraped out into Tupperware and set that on the kitchen counter before heading back to work.
While you can not save the comb for the bees, save it for your self and melt it down. In my bee house I have a bucket with burr comb and old comb from frames.
I take it when full to the freezer untill I have enough to melt. Then I sell it to a friend for his candle and hand cream business.
 
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