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After a recent post I would like to make an observation.

MB likes small cell, FGMO and Ox. acid(?)
Dr. R is of FGMO and thymol
Dee Lusby is of the private stock of genetic selection and small cell.
Some have had success with Russians. (Webb's of Goergia)
This list could get lengthy.

The point being that many people have success for varied reasons with beekeeping. Most of these outspoken individuals have success I feel do to the amount of time in the hive, their attention to detail, and the knowledge they have amassed over time.

Many beekeepers do not requeen, miss signs of poison in the hive, let the hive go into winter "light" or with a non-laying queen or with no fall brood. Many, do not do mite tests on a regular basis, miss early signs of obvious deseases, let their hives swarm endlessly, improperly prepare their hives for winter, and so on.

I wonder if one person, I'll take MB (seems like a fan favorite) would not have success in whatever mode he took, given his ability to catch and minimize other hive problems before they reach critical levels.
Assuming that at least in the north, that hive kill in the 10-15% range would be normal since alot can happen in 3 to 5 months you may not be looking in the hive due to cold. And looking at the percentage rate beyond this range, it would interesting to find out what percent was attributed to the mites, and what would be attributed to the poor management items, some of which are listed earlier. I've said before that mites get blamed for alot. This "mite" kill rate would be alot lower if everything else was done properly. Just something to think about.

As with most of what I say, perhaps a disclaimer needs to given. I make these statements based on actual eyewitness situations, and not withstanding that some of beesource members are not to be included in this group of poor beekeepers that I have referenced. I have not mentioned my pro-gun stance, not degraded any democrate, never once did I mention the group PETA, brought "rights" into the matter, nor did I disagree with Barry one time. I hope this covers it. (I would do a blinking yellow head guy at this point but forgot how.
 
G

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Here's a few observations that might help:

1) Bees not only survive, but thrive under a wide range
of outright abuses inflicted by beekeepers.

2) All but a tiny fraction of beekeepers lack the patience,
time, and required number of hives to do controlled studies
and verify that their techniques are the actual reason for
their (claimed) success.

3) The typical hobby beekeeper will only keep bees for a total
of 5 years before giving up beekeeping for another hobby, perhaps
stamp collecting. (A decrease from 10 years ago, when the average
was about 7 years.)

4) Despite the near-infinite number of books on beekeeping now
in print, the typical beekeeper own less than a dozen books on
the subject. Of roughly 250,000 beekeepers in the USA, only
15% to 18% subscribe to a beekeeping magazine. Only about 1%
read any of the internet forums.

5) Weather has much more impact on bee colony success and
harvestable yield than the efforts of the beekeeper. Beekeeping
is farming after all, and honey crop harvested by the bulk of
beekeepers comes from flowering trees and plants considered "weeds".

6) No beekeeper can control pests and diseases unless all beekeepers
within flight range of each other's hives coordinate their efforts.
The primary reason for my success is simple, and is common to many
others (who may not ever admit it) - simple distance from other
beekeepers, who's hives might somehow "infect" or "infest" mine.

7) As for as disease and pest control, it really does not matter
in the least what method one uses to control the pests and diseases.
What matters is the regular testing and monitoring done by the
successful beekeeper to track the status of his/her hives.
One cannot control that which they do not measure.

8) Few beekeepers keep records of any value in reviewing their
actions over time, so most beekeepers are simply unaware of the
impact of their own actions on their hives, if any.

9) There are no "magic bullets". There is no single factor or
single methodology that will assure success. All those who claim
to have "the answer" are merely fooling themselves, and doing a
disservice to others. The only effective methodology is a fluid
blend of different techniques and practices tuned to an n-dimensional
matrix of conditions. In short, "broken-field running and ad-hoc
intervention as required".

10) The price of honey is eternal vigilance.




[This message has been edited by jfischer (edited April 30, 2004).]
 

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>7) As for as disease and pest control, it really does not matter
in the least what method one uses to control the pests and diseases.
What matters is the regular testing and monitoring done by the
successful beekeeper to track the status of his/her hives.
One cannot control that which they do not measure.

This is what I keep saying. No matter what methods you decide to use you HAVE to mointor in order to know if its working. If you just use a method and don't monitor you won't know if it's succeeding or failing. I think any method is dependant on the details and without feedback you can't know if you're doing any good.

I would NEVER suggest anyone use ANY method blindly and assume it's working.
 

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"I wonder if one person, I'll take MB (seems like a fan favorite) would not have success in whatever mode he took, given his ability to catch and minimize other hive problems before they reach critical levels."


"What matters is the regular testing and monitoring done by the
successful beekeeper to track the status of his/her hives."
.......................................

Both of these statements remind me of a Medieval statement: "The foot of the farmer fertilizes the land"

Things in general DO seem to work out the best when someone is paying attention.
 
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