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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been reading some of the past forums where other beekeepers have started using all deeps. Some mentioned that they had some hives stacked as high as 5 deeps. My question is, if any of you beekeepers are running all deeps, do you use queen excluders to keep the queen from laying in every deep? If so, where do you place the excluder? On the first or on the second deep?
 

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if you do, recommend to use 8 frames. Otherwise, it is pain in the neck to take them off. It is heavy and after the third one, you don't have much leverage to lift up unless using stair, etc...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
if you do, recommend to use 8 frames. Otherwise, it is pain in the neck to take them off. It is heavy and after the third one, you don't have much leverage to lift up unless using stair, etc...
I'm currently using 10 frame deeps. Would using 8 frames cause any issues with the extra added space? Would the bees become more prone to swarming?
 

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I'm currently using 10 frame deeps. Would using 8 frames cause any issues with the extra added space? Would the bees become more prone to swarming?
I think they are referring to using an 8-frame box with 8 frames; as opposed to using 8 frames in your 10-frame box(s). Some beeks install one less frame, than the box is designed for, to allow the bees to draw the comb out a little longer than normal. This makes it easier to uncap when harvesting the honey.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think they are referring to using an 8-frame box with 8 frames; as opposed to using 8 frames in your 10-frame box(s). Some beeks install one less frame, than the box is designed for, to allow the bees to draw the comb out a little longer than normal. This makes it easier to uncap when harvesting the honey.
Aaahh.... I gotcha now. Thanks for clarifying that.... :thumbsup:
 

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My question is, if any of you beekeepers are running all deeps, do you use queen excluders to keep the queen from laying in every deep?
I do not, and find it rare that the queen has taken the brood up into the forth & fifth deep. Unless the bottom deeps are just drawn comb and they are moving up.
 

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@bluescorpion, have a look here: it discusses what your concerns are https://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?351251-9-frames-in-a-10

I use two deep brood boxes as I explained further up in that thread (#8) and normally three supers with eight deep frames and I agree with other posts that the bees make a mess if using foundation frames (not drawn) eight in a deep ten box. Made that mistake once. I also noticed, that it is useful to check the B1 & B2 during heavy flow and remove a full honey frame or two without any eggs or brood and move it up in to a super and put foundation in 2 frames from the center, left or right.

I am done using queen excluders, if the queen goes up, let her, normally she has a reason. I don't take full supers off, just pull the filled frames, sweep the bees of and push any frame with brood away from the center and install wet frames in the center, partial frames just beside. The full frames go in empty supers on my little garden cart and then in my garage after I have swept them again. I start with the top box and it is then much lighter to move off to go to S1 or S2. I only have four hives, so mass it not the issue for me, probably different for large operations.

It all goes quick once one has the routine worked out. When I have a good flow, I remove 15-18 heavy frames per hive in 15 minutes = 250-300 lbs honey from four hives in about one hour to go in my heated storage for 24 hrs to be extracted.

Joerg
 

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When I was young and rapidly expanding I ran all deeps as it was cheaper and I needed this years drawn supers for next years brood nest frames. My solution for supering and pulling honey was to put the hives in two rows just far enough apart so my little tonner flatbed would fit between them. Sometime the stack got pretty high With yellow sweet clover blooming six feet high with an understory of uncut alfalfa. Wish I had pasture like that now. I ran double brood boxes but did not use an excluder because non of the commercial guys I listened to used them. The predjudice I was taught was that the excluders bady hurt honey production by damaging bee wings and slowing them down. I had three hundred colonies and didn't own an excluder. Life is easier using the excluders if you learn to manage for them. Now I have thirty some colonies and an excluder on every colony and sometimes two.
 

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When I was young and rapidly expanding I ran all deeps as it was cheaper and I needed this years drawn supers for next years brood nest frames.
This is my plan for this year. I am running all deeps this year to get as much comb drawn as i can and at the end of the season i hope to have 3-400 drawn deep combs. Next year i will start running mediums for supers. I bought 40 deeps from mann lake last year and will order 40-60 mediums when they run a sale later in the year.
 

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I use all deeps. Usually a queen excluder between the 2nd and 3rd box. Some hives seem to hesitate to cross the excluder so I usually just remove it the next time I check on them. Many of my boxes have 8 drawn frames with metal rim spacer in 10 frame boxes. Makes uncapping easier at harvest time. The brood boxes have 10 frames in them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
@bluescorpion, have a look here: it discusses what your concerns are https://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?351251-9-frames-in-a-10


I am done using queen excluders, if the queen goes up, let her, normally she has a reason. I don't take full supers off, just pull the filled frames, sweep the bees of and push any frame with brood away from the center and install wet frames in the center, partial frames just beside.

Joerg
Ok I was with ya till you mentioned "Wet Frames". What do you mean by Wet Frames?

Thanks for clarifying.
 

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Wet frames are the frames that have just gone thru your honey removal system - still have residual sticky stuff and need to be cleaned up to a dry condition before storage or re-using.
 

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Wet frames are the frames that have just gone thru your honey removal system - still have residual sticky stuff and need to be cleaned up to a dry condition before storage or re-using.
I never worry about wet supers being stored but I suppose I don't have the ant problems you probably have. I kill the ants outside the building. I keep my supers sticky/wet because the bees jump right on them to repair them and get them ready for storing surplus. Never a problem getting bees working in the supers!
 
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