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For what purpose? You can buy it as a supplement for your diet from any health food store and most online supplement places. For grafting, I think fresh is better and is easy enough to get from queen cells, but I find it unnecessary for grafting. I tried it and the bees just remove it anyway.

But here is how it is usually gathered for grafting:
http://www.bushfarms.com/beesqueenrearingsimplified.htm#c6
"If you have no royal jelly on hand, a colony may be made queenless until they build queen-cells, when you can get the jelly from them. After the first grafting, some of the jelly in a few cells you have produced may be used; but, in this way you continually destroy good queen cells.

As a container for royal jelly, I use a small porcelain jar with a screw cap. A piece of waxed cardboard in the cover makes it air-tight. Let me offer a suggestion as to where you can get one of these jars. Make a raid on your wife's manicuring outfit, and, if luck is with you, you will find one of these jars. To be sure that luck will be with you, better do it when she is out. This jar usually has some pink dope in it. Take this out, put it into a tin can, present it to your wife with your compliments and make off with the jar. Thoroughly sterilize this jar by boiling, for the bees seem to object to the funny smell that comes with it. If your wife does not have this, or if you do not have a wife, you can go to the drug store and find just the size and style that suit you. The dope looks as though it might be of use if you put it into the grease cups of your flivver, but I do not want to suggest too many dangerous experiments for you to try all at once. For a jelly spoon, I prefer to make one out of the bone handle of a toothbrush, which also may be found in the manicuring outfit. Break off the brush and whittle down the small end until it fits nicely into a worker-cell. This jelly spoon and the jelly jar are to be carried in the pocket of your trousers or dress, whichever you wear. While working with your bees during the season you will be running across colonies that have royal jelly to spare. Whenever a swarm issues, just take out the jar and spoon and get the royal jelly. I have found that I come across enough in my regular work so that I never have to make any special hunt for jelly. It is well to have two of these jars; keep one in your pocket and the other in the grafting room. "--Jay Smith, Queen Rearing Simplified

But Jay changed his mind and said this in Better Queens:
http://www.bushfarms.com/beesbetterqueens.htm#Shortcomings of the Grafting Method
"We used to prime our cells with bee milk but, after careful examination, believe it was a detriment, for the first thing the bees do is to remove all the milk we had put in. Grafting in bare cells is better-or rather not so bad."
 

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I'm trying to read up on queen rearing methods now so that when my short queen rearing season does come, I'll spend more time queen rearing than reading. I'm currently reading Queen Rearing Simplified by Jay smith. Jay describes dipping and making home made queen cells with sticks which seems hard to follow for me, so I have ordered the push in queen cups from Brushy Mountain. My question is: When I receive these in the mail, should I then set up a double boiler and use my finest white wax to dip these apparently plastic cell cups in, to make them seem more real to the bees? Or will dipping these preformed cell cups alter their dimensions to the point that they will be rejected as queen cells. And from the previous post...I guess it is not crucial to prime these cells with royal jelly prior to grafting the 12 hour old larva?
 
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