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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are in the dearth here in central VA.

We have three enormous Rose of Sharon bushes/trees covered in blooms, with bumblebees, little wild bees, carpenter bees and hummingbirds all over them.

The Rose of Sharons were my ace in the hole for my new bee hobby, but my bees are ignoring them completely. Why don't my honeybees notice them? If the hummingbirds are on them, they are surely full of nectar.

Could all the bumblebees be keeping them away, or do they just not like them? Does anyone know?
 

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We are in the dearth here in central VA.

We have three enormous Rose of Sharon bushes/trees covered in blooms, with bumblebees, little wild bees, carpenter bees and hummingbirds all over them.

The Rose of Sharons were my ace in the hole for my new bee hobby, but my bees are ignoring them completely. Why don't my honeybees notice them? If the hummingbirds are on them, they are surely full of nectar.

Could all the bumblebees be keeping them away, or do they just not like them? Does anyone know?
Plants that hummingbirds like generally keep their nectar deep in the flower structure, which they can get to with their long tongues. Rose of Sharon attracts hummingbirds and butterflies -- both of which have very long tongues (or proboscis). Honey bees don't like the same kinds of flowers for nectar (in general).

Bumbles like them for their pollen (probably the carpenter bees as well). Based on this thread you might see honey bees on them for pollen.
 

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We have both Rose of Sharon and Flowering Quince. Around here the bees cover the Quince and mostly ignore the Rose of Sharon.

Alex
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies, and thanks for the link, Shelley.
Interesting that some people get bees on theirs and some don't. I wonder if there are variations in the flower type among the various ROS varieties?

Either way, our bees would rather starve than go on the ROS. Disappointing.
 

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Either way, our bees would rather starve than go on the ROS. Disappointing.
Ornamental <> good forage.
Just how it is.
Many of the good forage plants have very little ornamental value (even probably negative value).
 

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We are in the dearth here in central VA.

We have three enormous Rose of Sharon bushes/trees covered in blooms, with bumblebees, little wild bees, carpenter bees and hummingbirds all over them.

The Rose of Sharons were my ace in the hole for my new bee hobby, but my bees are ignoring them completely. Why don't my honeybees notice them? If the hummingbirds are on them, they are surely full of nectar.

Could all the bumblebees be keeping them away, or do they just not like them? Does anyone know?
The problem with common names is that unless your looking at the plant in question the name tells you nothing. Rose of Sharon is the common name of a plant whose scientific name is Hypericum olympicum, unfortunately that common name is also used for several species from different genera. As a horticulturalist, if I had a dollar for evertime I have had to identify a plant for a person only to discover that the common name was ascribed to a different species entirely, I'd be a very wealthy man today. Latin nomenclature may be a little offputting but, thanks to Carl Linnaeus, it truly is one name one plant.
 

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I adore phacelia and white clover. Experimenting with figwort. Never heard of Rose of Sharon being a big draw. Trees best bang for the buck.
 

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We are in the dearth here in central VA.

We have three enormous Rose of Sharon bushes/trees covered in blooms, with bumblebees, little wild bees, carpenter bees and hummingbirds all over them.

The Rose of Sharons were my ace in the hole for my new bee hobby, but my bees are ignoring them completely. Why don't my honeybees notice them? If the hummingbirds are on them, they are surely full of nectar.

Could all the bumblebees be keeping them away, or do they just not like them? Does anyone know?
I have a rose of sharon in the front yard and I've never seen honebees working the blooms :)
 
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