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Had two deep boxes and three mediums supers, containing frames with plastic foundation (no drawn comb), stacked in my garage with a piece of plywood on top. They've been like this for just over a month. Decided to move them on Sunday and was shocked to find them infested with wax moth. There were cacoons and crawling larvae everywhere. I immediately took them outside and headed to an appointment.

I spent the better part of my evening hosing out the boxes and scraping the larvae and cacoons from every nook and cranny that I could. I even used a wood skewer to dig them from the holes between the sides and top and bottom bars. Removed the foundation from many of the frames as they were even in the grooves of the top and bottom bars. I got most of them but I'm sure I missed a few of the little wigglers.

I'm wondering if I can stack these few boxes, seal them up with tape, and place some paramoth on them to kill any remaining larvae and/or eggs? In the future, I plan to store them stacked cross-wise so the air and light can get inside.
 

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I assume that the frames have no more drawn wax on them, correct? If this is the case, you could store them any way you want since the key ingredient, wax, is no longer there for food. Moths won't infest them if there is no wax.
 

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Eric's point is correct. No food, no moths.
In future, remember this; Wax moths, larvae and eggs can all be killed by putting the frames in the deep freeze for 2 or 3 days. After thawing, making sure they are dry, put the frames in heavy plastic trash bags with a dose of BTh in the boxes. They can then be stored without any moth infestation.
Your plan of storing the boxes cris-crossed will allow mice, spiders and other bugs access to build nests.
 

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There really wasn't any wax to infest or eat. Only one frame had a half-drawn area of wax the size of 50 cent piece, which they didn't bother. The majority were the plastic foundation, which I didn't think would provide enough was for them to eat.
 

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A slight correction - the term 'wax-moth' is slightly misleading, in that the wax-moth doesn't actually live on a diet of wax at all. Studies have been done with pure wax comb, and the wax-moths promptly died. It's the impurities within the wax comb they're after - hence their burrowing behaviour as they search further and further afield for nutrients such as dead larvae and larval residue. Newly-drawn white comb doesn't hold any attraction for them, so usually escapes their attention. It's used brood comb which is most at risk.
LJ
 

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I had the same problem last year. I lost a hive early, then I stored it in a closed environment. When I opened it up later I had moldy frames because of no circulation and the brood boxes had wax moth. I have been trying not to use chemicals, so I came up with a device that I can store my frames without chemicals and it allows air flow. I do have to freeze the frames before I put them in. Look on the web site www.resterfarms.com and click on the tab Frame Vault. It has worked so far with long term storage. Good luck
 

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I have discovered a similar issue with some of my stored frames. I've seen many people say freeze the frames for a day or two. Freezing this many frames would be challenging for me with only a small freezer. I do have access to a large walk in cooler with the temperature set at 44 degrees. Is this cool enough to kill the larva/moths?
 

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I have discovered a similar issue with some of my stored frames. I've seen many people say freeze the frames for a day or two. Freezing this many frames would be challenging for me with only a small freezer. I do have access to a large walk in cooler with the temperature set at 44 degrees. Is this cool enough to kill the larva/moths?
No, it must be much colder to kill moth eggs/larvae. It must be under 32 degrees for at least 48 hours. My own personal thought is that it should be in the single digits for 2 days to really be sure everything is killed. My chest freezer is about 9 degrees and I haven't had any issues with storage. You just need to be careful removing the frames from the freezer because the wax is very brittle before it warms up and it doesn't take much to damage it..
 

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I have a bunch of frames from the boxes I just removed. I bunch still have honey residue from my extraction. After I let the bees lick them clean any reason I’d expcect mold if I store them in a closed container. Will mold grow on comb?
 

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I have a bunch of frames from the boxes I just removed. I bunch still have honey residue from my extraction. After I let the bees lick them clean any reason I’d expcect mold if I store them in a closed container. Will mold grow on comb?
If you store them in a damp basement, they will probably mold. I have my frames stored in bins, inside, in an empty bedroom where the humidity is relatively low. I regularly open the bins to check to make sure they are okay.
 

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I have included a good link to a site form Clemson University. They recommend freezing for a day or two. I don't have a lot of freezer space either, so I freeze 10 or 20 frames at a time then put them back in the box. I use the Frame Vault at that time to keep the ones that I froze separate from the ones that haven't been. This keeps them from being re-infested and it allows the frames to breath.


https://www.clemson.edu/extension/beekeepers/fact-sheets-publications/wax-moth-ipm-publication.html
 

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I have wax frames that I need to store. Suggestions for storing properly that won't left the wax frames mold? There is honey left in some of the cells.
 
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