Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bees arrived yesterday(Saturday) 12 hour trip by truck was 5 1/2 hours longer than expected due to bad weather. Dead bees in bottom of box-don't know what is "normal" amount to expect. Moderately *windy*, 40 deg, rain expected but has not arrived. Everything I have read & viewed online & in books advises not to install on a windy day. Any advice would be appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
776 Posts
Looks like your going to be getting some great weather starting tomorrow. You can hold them in the garage or some place cool and dry till then. It sure wouldn't hurt to make up some sugar syrup to spray on the sides of the cage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you so much. It does look like the weather is going to clear up tomorrow. I just wasn't sure I should wait another day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,713 Posts
I installed packages yesterday (Denver area). We were having intermittent rain and cool weather. The rain became semi-steady as I finished. I like a cool break right after I hive a package - it gives them some time to settle in. Today is has rained and drizzled all day, and the forecast is for much the same tomorrow. The syrup cans aren't empty, yet, and the packages (now hives) are snuggled up on top of my overwintered colonies.

I hived the packages on a regular bottom board, with the larger sized entrance reducer, and let them settle in. Early this morning I lifted them off the bottom boards & placed them them over on top of existing colonies. I placed double screen boards over several lower colony's inner covers, then the package hives. I hived them on 4 medium frames of comb, some "halfs" and some bare frames. Each 3 lb package covered about 4 medium drawn frames once they settled in.

If I had to set them on their own bottom board, I'd consider using a division board to restrict the "cavity" to 6-7 mediums to begin with. Otherwise, using the smallest entrance reducer hole would help. A 5 frame deep would be about the same - the bees should cover ~3 deep frames of comb. It's surprising just how much heat 3 lbs of bees can generate - the warmth is readily noticeable to the bare hand above the new packages. All the same, since I have the equipment, I sleep better knowing these new colonies won't be chilled for the next month or so while the population rebounds.This system has served me well for hiving spring packages & new queen splits for many, many years. In another month there shouldn't be much more concern about cold weather & chilled brood for those of us along the east side of the Rockies.

My packages had ~1/2 inch of dead bees in the bottoms. If it were much over an inch, I might be a bit alarmed.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top