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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been looking and I can’t find Robo’s plans any more. Anyone know where it’s at. Heck I even looked at buying one from Bushkill but they are out of stock. I think i could wing it but i sure would prefer plans. Thanks.
 

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There are plans for a Bee Vac in this thread:

... scroll down to post #28. Note that this is not the "Robo" vac per se, but similar.
 

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I made a vid several years ago.
You should be able to make one from the video.
I do not use the shim with the screen in it anymore, just too cumbersome for me.
 

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I made one years ago consists of three parts, 1. a base with a hole to take vac pipe 2. standard full depth box with drawn frames and 3. a top with fly screen mesh and a slide out section to take vac and adjust air flow strength. I aso originall had a central slide but did not find it necessary.
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I made a vid several years ago.
You should be able to make one from the video.
I do not use the shim with the screen in it anymore, just too cumbersome for me.
What do you do instead of the shim?
I made one years ago consists of three parts, 1. a base with a hole to take vac pipe 2. standard full depth box with drawn frames and 3. a top with fly screen mesh and a slide out section to take vac and adjust air flow strength. I aso originall had a central slide but did not find it necessary. View attachment 67105 View attachment 67105 View attachment 67106
View attachment 67105 View attachment 67107 View attachment 67105 View attachment 67106 View attachment 67107
when you go to add brood frames or a queen do you just quickly remove the top and place the new box on since your not using the shim?
 

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What do you do instead of the shim?

when you go to add brood frames or a queen do you just quickly remove the top and place the new box on since your not using the shim?
When you vac the swarm or cutout into the box you already have 10 drawn out frames in the box for the bees to hang onto and the queen should have come along for the ride as well. There is flyscreen mesh on the top section sothat once you have finished you can slide out the top without releasing the bees and giving them plenty of venterlation.Once moved to the apiary it is a simple job of putting them on a proper base and even leaving the top on to let them settle on the frames. Maybe even feed them 1:1 sugar water and check back in a few days for indication of the queen (or requeen if you want)
 

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No plans needed, unless you want to get fancy.
It's more about what features you want and what your power unit is.
I used a bucket head for power.
I separated the screen from the power unit so I can remove it for a second box of bees.
I also integrated a trap door in the screen so I can transfer bees from the dirty vacuum box into a clean box above (STINGLESS in the worst conditions)
I included tabs on the sections so that if the vac was dropped it would be more likely to stay together.
I used a large diameter hose to lower the airspeed in the hose.
I used a variable speed controller to slow down the vac rather than leak suction, it runs quieter and cooler.
It's heavier than a bucket vac but a workhorse.





Also I trimmed down the motor and split the strap around the motor as the single strap across the top of the motor was not good for it.



Another thought is a deep box is not necessary, you can fit a whole lot of bees in a shallow 10 frame box.
It can be made more compact by eliminating the adapter boards, If I build another bottom I'll move the reinforcement to the inside.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
When you vac the swarm or cutout into the box you already have 10 drawn out frames in the box for the bees to hang onto and the queen should have come along for the ride as well. There is flyscreen mesh on the top section sothat once you have finished you can slide out the top without releasing the bees and giving them plenty of venterlation.Once moved to the apiary it is a simple job of putting them on a proper base and even leaving the top on to let them settle on the frames. Maybe even feed them 1:1 sugar water and check back in a few days for indication of the queen (or requeen if you want)
I was wondering how you handled it when you saved brood comb from a cut out or you happened to catch the queen?
 

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Sometimes in a cutout the queen will attempt to fly and escape, but a "layer" can't fly and you will find her on the floor.

I have seen this quite a few times.

Yes it's best to catch the queen for both a lure and to insure her safety. I would not intentionally vacuum a queen.
 

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What do you do instead of the shim?

when you go to add brood frames or a queen do you just quickly remove the top and place the new box on since your not using the shim?
Yes,
vacuumed bees on the bottom and the brood comb on the top. Now it is set up as a double deep for a few days until things settle down and I can come back and arrange everything as I think they should be.




Sometimes in a cutout the queen will attempt to fly and escape, but a "layer" can't fly and you will find her on the floor.

I have seen this quite a few times.

Yes it's best to catch the queen for both a lure and to insure her safety. I would not intentionally vacuum a queen.
UUUHHH...........a layer can fly, have seen this several times.
If you take your time you will almost always find the queen, but sometimes she will take a ride in the bee vac. She will usually run and hide, after most of the comb is cut out take a break and if she is in hiding most times she will come around and be standing on comb. So always leave a comb for her to stand on, even if you put it back in before your break.
 

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I don't want to be argumentative, and there is always the exception, but a laying queen is very often too heavy to fly.
 
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