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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know a lot of beeks don't believe this helps but I do.So I plan on continuing this practice because I do think it works. Overwintering with 2 deeps its pretty simple, just swap the bottom with the top when the time is right .My problem is I overwinter with 4 ,8 frame meds.and there is not much info out there for med. 8ts only for the normal 10 frame deep. .What would be the correct way to reverse these ?I have taken the top 2 boxes and reversed with the 2 bottom boxes and then a few weeks later I will swap them back and so on up to 3 or 4 times. I have swapped the top box only with the bottom box the first reverse and the following reverses only bring the bottom to the top.I have done this both ways and I know the main thing is not to split the brood nest.Is there any other med. 8 frame only beeks that have experience reversing your med.8 frames and how do you reverse.
 

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I have all ways run 8 frame meds, 3 boxes. When it's time I just reverse according to cluster location. Meaning I see where cluster is & go from there.
That way I don't accidentally separate the cluster. Hope this helps.
 

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If you have four boxes, and the brood is in the two upper ones (as it likely will be when they are building out), d do not break them apart -simply set those two aside while you rummage through the two bottoms ones.

I think the most important principal is not breaking apart any 2-box-spanning brood cluster. Even though it's in two boxes, they should be though of as (temporarily) being a single unit. You can separate the boxes to move them, but they shouldn't be left that way when close back up again.

If you're going to do it Walt Wright style, then assemble a set of frames from the two lower boxes, mixing frames that are empty and frames with some bits of honey and pollen, Fill one box with the best assortment, leave the rest below. Put the box "with the rest" of the frames in the lowest position, then move the two boxes with the brood in them on top of the bottom one. And then top the stack with the box you assembled. Chances are they will keep moving upwards and soon will have brood in the top two boxes, again. If so, repeat this step, always placing the active brood boxes in the middle with a reversed box on top.

If you don't care to do it that way, simply choose one of the boxes below the pair of brood boxes and bring it up on top, leaving the other one in place. Don't move two boxes up at one time. Leave one below the brood boxes at all times until you're well into spring and it doesn't matter any more. That box below will help keep the brood warm by lifting it away from the front entrance.

Personally, I do it Walt's way (with my three deeps that I winter on). With deeps there isn't often brood in more than a single box, but the principal is the same one -repeatedly cycling the boxes around and keeping the bees brooding always UP into a new box of empty, drawn comb. The other advantage of Walt's way is that it feeds the bees the remnants of the honey they left behind during the winter, so little is carried over into the new honey year. Bees, in my cold area won't easily go back down to harvest stores below their nest, so there are always half-frames here and there, especially on the outsides, that they will eat if brought up to "new" top box and alternated with enticing drawn, but empty, brood combs.

I also do MattDavey's technique of opening the sides of the brood nest with partial sheets of foundation in otherwise empty frames, a bit later on, in combination with the continued reversing. I reverse my deeps at least two times, occasionally more when spring starts really early. I also keep a medium as the lowest box. It is usually filed with pollen and I almost never more it out of position. Moving the active brood box down one level within the overall stack (by putting another box above it), moves the brood, at least temporarily, closer to their pollen storehouse. Can't argue with that.

But what ever works for you, is the best.

Nancy
 

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I reverse. Every year. When I don't, swarming skyrockets. Even if I add supers way early, I find that reversing is still important.

My broodnests are two deeps and a medium, with that medium somewhere in the stack. I allow the colonies to build up enough so that when I reverse, any brood that might get separated by reversing has enough bees to care for it. Those that haven't built to that level, we might do a partial reversal. Bottom is pulled, top two boxes go on bottom board, and bottom box goes on top.

I do have hives that are all mediums. Four or five high. I follow the same plan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys , you all are great.This is such a wonderful site, to have access to all of you and your knowledge is a great thing . Thanks again.:applause::thumbsup:
 

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Inverse it if there is brood in top box. 1234 to 4321. If not strip boxes unail brood then inverse, then put the empties on top
 
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