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I have a hive that died out in late fall. I’m confident that it was mites and virus. The hive dwindled with more crawling bees outside the hive every day until it just petered out.

The bees left a wealth of comb, honey and pollen that I would like to put back to use on other hives. Is there any concern about passing viruses on to another colony through resources that have been stored in the garage for several months?

Is there anything I should do to reduce the risk of transmission? Set it out in the sun for a day? Would it be better to wait until the hives are thriving before adding resources, or can I put this honey on a hungry hive while they are still just beginning to ramp up into spring?
 

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Viruses in general don't live long outside of a live body.
I'd just take stuff and use it without second thoughts.
 

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Randy oliver just posted on bee L that he uses them all the time with no trouble. The foul brood hives might be a different story though.
Cheers
gww
 

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Good empty comb and honey no problem.
Pollen combs I look at closely.Is there entombed pollen?Is the pollen over a year old?
Do you live in an ag area where there could be pesticide contamination?Are the frames more than 30% pollen(pollen bound)? These for me are all grounds for culling.
I do not reuse brood comb if it has more than a handful of dead brood or is more than 3 yrs old.
Deadouts are also a good excuse to remove misshapen,holey or excessive drone comb.
 

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I often take the top box off a dead out and place it on top of a booming light hive, to insure the growth continues, and the comb gets cleaned up , and prep that hive for a split. :) I like big spring hive to split from.

IF it is still cold outside reverse the frames from outside to inside. IE from 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 place the frames, 5,4,3,2,1,10,9,8,7,6 you want the fullest frames in the center where the bees contact to prevent a gap between bees and stores. often the center of the dead out is hollow of stores and the bees need to move up 4-6 inches to make contact, which may leave brood behind. the easy way is to have a empty box, place it first and add the frames fullest in center, with a quick clean up of burr and propolis, 5 min like 30 sec a frame.

the bottom deep will likely be fairly empty good comb for splits or expansion or packages.

GG
 

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I have a hive that died out in late fall. I’m confident that it was mites and virus. The hive dwindled with more crawling bees outside the hive every day until it just petered out.

The bees left a wealth of comb, honey and pollen that I would like to put back to use on other hives. Is there any concern about passing viruses on to another colony through resources that have been stored in the garage for several months?

Is there anything I should do to reduce the risk of transmission? Set it out in the sun for a day? Would it be better to wait until the hives are thriving before adding resources, or can I put this honey on a hungry hive while they are still just beginning to ramp up into spring?
There was an article written by Christine Wahl, PhD and Emma Walters from Cornell in the Fall 2020 EAS Journal stating that viruses linger in deadout comb and honey. Although the virus levels detected were relatively low, the authors cautioned that such virus transmission can be harmful but further research needs to be done. I would closely monitor your colonies to detect DWV, etc.
 
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