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I have a hive that was killed by mites, and I was wondering what could be salvaged from it and what had to go.
It's two deeps and a super. The super's nearly all full of honey, there's a bunch in the deeps as well. If I replace the bees could I just leave that?
The frames and boxes are only about a year old, so I assume I can keep them, but what should I do about the dead brood? Should I replace the foundation, or can I just scrape the comb off it?
These are just a few questions I had. Any insight into what I should be doing would be much appreciated!
 

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It can be reused, but if you live somewhere that the comb has not been frozen, I would freeze it in case there are wax moth or SHB eggs. If left unprotected, there will be soon. There is a possibility that there may even be tiny larvae that are difficult to spot. It is a bit early for that in my area, though.
The bees will clean out any brood in the combs especially if it is all uncapped.
Two deeps and a super is too much room for a package of bees to protect. You could start with two empty brood combs and a couple of deeps with honey. Add in new combs as needed.
Good luck with your new bees.

Alex
 

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As AHudd mentioned as long as you don't have wax moth or hive beetles just use it as normal. You can install a package right into the existing comb and they will clean up any dead bees, dead brood, mold, mildew and repair anything needing it. They are incredible at it so I wouldn't do anything other than previously mentioned.

If you go with a package or nuc I'd pick your best frames to use in the single deep first, then as they expand offer the second box with the other frames. I also use the opportunity to cull out any bad frames or repair anything needed. You can also scrape the tops and sides of the frames to make them a little "fresher" as well.

Hopefully you have bees on order and will back up and running. You're certainly not the first or last who has lost bees to mites - but hopefully learned from in and adjusted your planned treatment schedule/type.
 
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