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what do ya'll think about removing any cells found during the split, then inspecting a week later to confirm new cells and remove all but one or two of them. so far the handful of cut downs i have done have not swarmed and made a decent crop. like david says, the more drawn comb the better. and from what i can tell so far the more bees left behind the better.
 

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Anyway, cut down splits are clearly not as simple as remove the queen - prevent swarming, make lots of honey - all in one step.
Each year is another learning experience, but I certainly agree with your assessment - no magic bullet, but another tool in the toolbox. BTW, I really enjoy your posts!! You obviously put a lot of thought in your contributions to beesource. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
I think in the case that the hive builds lots of cells after the split then something like what Tim B Suggested - "cut cells twice a week apart after removing the queen (leaving them hopelessly queenless) and then give a queen cell" - might be the ticket to break the swarm impulse and still get them re queened timely. Another possibility might be to make mating nucs with swarm cells and resources obtained during the splitting process then introduce caged queens when they're ready.

So something like:

1) Do early management to delay/prevent swarming as long as possible.
2) As late as possible but When swarm prep gets to the point you feel the need - go ahead and do the cut down splits, and make mating nucs using swarm cells obtained during the process. Remove all existing swarm cells from the hives.
3) Inspect a week later - hives which have produced many cells, remove the cells making those hives hopelessly queenless.
4) When the new queens are laying cage them and introduce them into the hives from step 3.

This would also give you the resources to requeen any other hives that didn't successfully do it their selves.

It sounds like a lot of work, but it's not far from what I've done this year anyway and compared to some other things I've tried it's been a breeze. Despite the spotty results this year all in all it looks like the honey crop is going to be pretty good - ironing out the process a bit should make it better though.

This has been helpful - thanks for the participation.
 

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Discussion Starter #24 (Edited)
Each year is another learning experience, but I certainly agree with your assessment - no magic bullet, but another tool in the toolbox. BTW, I really enjoy your posts!! You obviously put a lot of thought in your contributions to beesource. Thanks
Thanks, although I'm sure not everyone would agree.:rolleyes:
 

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Astrobee - differ at will, I can take it.

We must have a different situation owing to our movement of brood to equalize hive. We rarely see swam cells, and no evidence of SUCCESSFUL swarms. Maybe a third partly will visit and confirm our situation.

As long as you are happy with your methods, then does it really matter?

Crazy Roland
 

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We must have a different situation owing to our movement of brood to equalize hive. We rarely see swam cells, and no evidence of SUCCESSFUL swarms. Maybe a third partly will visit and confirm our situation.
We are also operating in very different flow conditions, so what effect that may have is hard to fully discern.
 
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