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I have read and talked a lot about requeening a hive. Should they be allowed to produce their own queen or should a new hybrid Russian (in this case) be purchased. I was doing a little web surfing and found this report from North Carolina State University. In the article it states that hybrid bees tend to lose their desirable traits over subsequent generations. I previously bought into the notion that bees left to their own would develope strong survival traits and therefore it may be best to let them make their own queen but according to their research the bees would in time lose their varroa and trachial mite resistance. I assume that only using new hybrid queens would help keep these desirable traits.
Am I mssing something?
Thanks

http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/entomology/apiculture/PDF files/2.16.pdf
 

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Use queens from Russian Honeybee Association member suppliers. Their queen rearing/mating protocol makes it very likely that their queens are 100% Russian. Hubert Tubbs, Mize, Mississippi, and Carl Webb, Georgia are two I've used and am pleased with .
 

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If the trait is bred in than it will just as easily be bred out.... however it is in the bees naturally to begin with before they could selectively breed for it.

My advice is not to get to caught up in the scientific research/development.... often it will just end up costing you more with little gain.
 

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From the June 2009 edition of BEE CULTURE the following is by Kim Flottum, editor:

"The most effective method to combat varroa mites is to use honey bees that are resistent to varroa mites. They exist. You can buy them. You can make them. You have to want them. They are the Russians. They are the survivors. They are hygenic. They are better than the rest. If these bees aren't in your colonies, on your list to buy, on the way to your colonies today... then you are on the list of those who are on the way out. That we continue to pour poison into our boxes when we could be pulling pure and perfect honey out of them instead is amazing."

Google Russian Honeybee Breeders Association for a list of members and contact information.
 

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Put my order in with Dwight Porter back in December. Hope he has a good winter and spring to fill the order because I'm excited about getting them.
 

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The first thing to find out is what are your expectations?

Are you buying russians only for the bred in traits? If there are non russian strains in the area, those drones in the DCA's will likely get hold of your queens and if they are not of the same stock, those queens will have diluted traits.

If you really want to keep the purity of your colonies intact, you might consider re-queening each year.

If you just want to bring in that strain to your other colonies, then let them mix it up.

it's what you want to achieve secondly. ( it's what the bees want to do first and foremost, heh heh)

Don't let others decide for you.

Decide what your expectations are, what you want to accomplish and pursue that course.

Just my little two cent of course.

Big Bear
 
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