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The one that emerged on June 1st into a world where the days were getting longer. The queen after June 21 would emerge into a world where the days were getting shorter and would not experience that change. Honestly I suspect a newly hatched queen lays like a "spring queen" and the summer solstice is a convenient point to reference when requeening in the summer. No?
 

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The one that emerged on June 1st into a world where the days were getting longer. The queen after June 21 would emerge into a world where the days were getting shorter and would not experience that change. Honestly I suspect a newly hatched queen lays like a "spring queen" and the summer solstice is a convenient point to reference when requeening in the summer. No?
Yes. We also have to remember location, location, location.
 

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We are talking about the age of the queen with her laying ability. Whether or not she is a before or after June queen is still a young queen. Let's say you have a summer dearth coming after May then raising these queens may not be properly fed. This will have an affect on how the hive overwintered. Yes, location also take into consideration here and so is the specie of bees you keep. The early October raised queens only had a few short months to pack in the hive resources before the cold winter sets in. They behaved just like a Spring hive trying to expand but with the big fat winter bees. Along with the hive population growth so are the mites (if you don't clean out the mites) that will have a big impact on how the hive survive this winter. Somehow if you can removed the mites off the colony then it will be a normal winter bees build up. Without the mites to bother them all colonies survived this past winter. That is why I have concluded that a queen raised after the solstice here can carry the hive overwinter into next Spring. This is my 3rd year into raising the summer and late Autumn queens.
 

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A May queen will do just as well laying the fall/winter bees as one raised after June 21, if she is in a healthy, well fed colony.

The solstice is just another day, ignore the "gimics" and raise well nourished virgins from good stock, and furnish healthy drones for her to mate with.
I wonder where this idea of solstice and queens comes from. Is there a paper somewhere, or did someone dream this up to fit their dogmatic approach to beekeeping. I disagree with the whole idea.
 

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Michael, G.M. Doolittle observed this and references it in his book(s). Mel Disselkoen from Michigan is a proponent and teaches such in his material. Doolittle was not a "gimic" kind of guy in my estimation.
 

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Where I get it from is a guy named Miller.
He muttered something about CC Miller the day he was telling me all about the post-solstice thing.
Guess I messed up by believing him. Turns out that all the people in the club I'm in don't really know anything at all including myself.
Am pretty certain that bees buzz but not so sure.
 

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JohnSchwartz; Could you tell me which of Doolittle's books you found his references to solstice queens? I have been searching the ones I have and can't find anything about queens other than they should be raised after the warm up in spring, the time of the year when bees would be getting ready to swarm.
 

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After the solstice or not we all know that a young queen will out produce an older queen. A well fed young
queen mated late Autumn will overwinter better. I'm not saying that an older queen cannot. Just that a young queen
can produce lots of broods during the Spring time and less likely to swarm in her first season coming out of winter. With a
young queen and swarm management I've never had a swarm yet. Production hive in 3 deep full of bees and never swarm at all.
Thanks to the young queens made late in the season that have no intention of swarming in their first year. I'm combining Palmer's nuc
method and Mel's late solstice queen method. Once you understand both method they are a right fit in our bee environment here.
 

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I have read in many different sources that you can just place a ready to emerge queen cell in the top of the top honey stores box. The cell will emerge and the virgin will kill the old queen most of the time, as a superceder replacement. There are a couple people here in the forms that do this, I can't recall just who at the moment though.

The ready to emerge cell is to be placed in the top honey storage area to give her some separation from the brood nest area which is below. A virgin queen is programmed to search out and kill other queens, and the old queen is slower as she is full off eggs and actively laying. I have read that this works in a high percentage of the colonies it is done on, and seems much easier than what is described in the link in the first post above.

Why wouldn't the old queen swarm and leave if there is a new queen going to be hatched?
 
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