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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have 4 hives that I want to requeen, after doing alot of reading and searching on this forum I came to this conclusion or method.
My new Queens are set to arrive on april 30th.. A week before I plan on going thru my hives and look for the original queens put them on 5 frame nucs just in case the new ones dont take. on May 1st. I'm taking my new queens to the yard to set them in the queenless hives. Before I place them on push in cages I plan to go thru the hole hive removing all the Queen cells.
Look for frames with emerging brood and set my queens on that frame and place it in the middle of the hive whait one more week and look for acceptance of the new queen, and if good acceptance release. Make Queen juice with old Queens.

Do yuo have any corrections or changes that you can suggest to my aproach.

thank you for any help.
 

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Are the four "old" queens unproductive? Do they have poor brood patterns, are they mean? If there are no problems, why waste four queens? Why not use the four new queens for splits?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The original queens are meaner than what I like to work, compare to my cordovan hive. As soon as I open the top cover ther is a bunch of bees hitting my veil. This four are from swarms or cutouts that I have cougth, and leaving in Southern California you are always specting some AHB.

thank you for your post.
 

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I would not wait a week to introduce your new queens! The bees know they're queenless within an hour or two of removing the old queen. If you wait any longer than 24 hours or so, you're just about guaranteed to have queen cells being built and the bees will not accept an introduced queen if they have started building cells, even if you go through and cut all the cells you can find. If you miss just one cell, easy to do, the new queen is a goner. We usually make our splits, or kill the old queen if requeening, and install cells or the new caged queen within 4-24 hours. I hate paying 20.00 or so for a new queen and have the bees kill her as soon as she sets foot outside the cage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I guess I will try the way fish_stix told me.
Does anybody agree with this method or has any other sugestion.

thanks
 

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I'll try to help out here.

I agree with fish stix no need to kill queens a week ahead of time.That will just give you queen cells to deal with making your requeen harder and more prone to acceptance failure. If your concerned with finding your queens ahead of time use an excluder to limit them to one box making your job easier when your new queens arrive.

Some things to remember when requeening.

A big strong colony full of bee's is difficult to requeen.
You can make it easier by giving your new queen more room to run and surrounding her with younger bee's. If the colony your going to requeen is overflowing with bee's add another box on top putting two or three frames of brood and emerging bee's into the added box even if the rest is only foundation. Empty comb is best but if comb is unavailable foundation will work to surround the brood frames. Place your queen cage around the emerging bee's they will accept her. Your older bee's will be in the bottom boxes and she'll know when it's safe for her to move down. One day I watched a released queen run around jumping on recently emerged bee's putting her scent on them. When they came into contact with older bee's they were attacked by the older bee's. That was how she spread her scent through the colony with little risk to herself. She probably was out too soon but the lesson was still learned. She also survived to head that colony. After I saw that happen the light bulb came on and new queen intro success went way up for me when dealing with requeening of strong colonies.

Old queens moved to a nuc in the same yard can go back to the original colony.
This may not be something you read about in the books/magazines but it can happen and I've witnessed it several times. Certainly introduced queens wouldn't do this but queens raised in the colony that have taken there mating flights from it know where their colony is and may decide they like their big strong colony better than the nuc you put her in. This may be a trait that my bee's carried as other's don't seem to talk about it much but be aware it can happen. If I were you I'd just pinch the old queens why take the risk.

You said your going to use push in cages.
Be sure to put the queens in them in an enclosed area or you might just watch your new queen fly away.

Hope this helps!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you Dragonfly130 for your post.

Can you clear something for me, You said that to put another box on top with some frames off brood and emerging bee's
Just put the box on top with out mesh to separate the boxes, or put the top box on top of the cober,

Thank you again!!
 

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We have found it quite difficult to requeen nasty hives with quiet queens in a queen cage, the only way we get good success is by doing a paper unite.
If you have a 2 box hive isolate the old queen to the bottom and put a split board in between the 2 boxs with the entrance facing backwards, all the older field bees will leave the top box and go back to the old queen leaving the younger nurse bees to look after your caged queen.
After she has been released and has her own sealed brood she is ready to be united back with the bottom box.
before you unite find the old queen in the bottom and knock her off, put 4 sheets of newspaper between the 2 boxs make sure there's no gaps, put your hive tool through the paper once to give them a start then put the top box back ontop of the newspaper.
We put a stick in the corner between the boxs just enough to give the bees in the top a way to come and go.
Easier to do than it sounds and with a very high rate of acceptance, but would only bother doing it with gnarly hives.
Kiwi
 
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