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Discussion Starter #1
I may be requeening 3 to 4 hives this season, due to aggression.

I will probably buy queens from R. Weaver or B. Weaver. If I went with B. Weaver, I would be getting same-strain queens. But with R. Weaver, I could get a buckfast or an All-American.

The only bees I have ever bought are from R. Weaver (SMR package). So I have not had the opportunity to experiment. The SMR hive is on its 4th season, never requeened. I think they have likely superceded, but I can't be sure. The marking on my queen came off during the first season (I know, because I saw her when half the marking had come off).

Thoughts?
 

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At this early point in the season, I might take a moment and think about getting a Northern queen from a supplier in the North. It sounds like re-queening is something that you want to do, opposed to something you HAVE to do immediately. While Northern queens aren't available just yet, if you can hold off, they should come available around early or mid-May.

Northern queens are reputed to be more winter hardy. They are more gentle, due to less likelihood of AHB genes. And they'll introduce good genetics into your gene pool. That's something we could all use.

Just something to maybe chew on...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I should add one more thing. I don't use any chemicals. I don't do anything for mites.

And I don't plan to do anything in the future. The Weaver queens allow me to do this.

Will queens from the north allow me to continue my "organic" practices?
 

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The one thing that comes to mind is that you are requeening due to aggression. I have read on here and other places the Tx Buckfast seems to have an attitude. Though I would like to hear a current report from someone that has the R Weaver Buckfast. I have only bought from B. and their bees are gentle and good producers.
 

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Every year I have the same debate, but only with my mutual funds and tomato plants! Mostly, I diversify! I don't put all of my eggs into one basket per say. Some years the Beefsteaks do better than the Big Boys or Mortgage Lifters! Same with bees I guess. I'd stick with one breed if you've had great luck and are sold on that breed. If not, do as you are, ask around for advice or keep trying different queens. Good luck!
 

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Actually, Texas and AHB is kind of amusing. The ONLY county in the south part of Texas that is considered to not have any AHB is the county that the Weaver's have their apiaries in. (Note: NOT trying to get into an AHB discussion here, just pointing out an ironic / humorous fact).

I've bought from B. Weaver and they seem to be very good. Of course the only reason I didn't buy from R. Weaver is because their website is outdated (design wise) and is way too disorganized.

The bees I got were very great and strong producers. Sadly, the late freeze we had killed them.
 

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Africanized bees do not have mite problems. (according to Dewey Caron)

One solution to not doing anything about mites is to get Africanized bees and learn to deal with the aggression and other characteristics. (Personally, I'd prefer to do something with mites, even if it was just culling drone brood.)
 

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Arthur is in Dallas, TX. I do not think a northern queen would be beneficial to him. His winters are rather mild, and his summers, esp. August, are like an oven. Perhaps not as bad as many locales in Arizona, but more than likely not conducive to northern queens.
 
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