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Discussion Starter #1
Howdy!
I discovered last Thursday that my colony is lacking it's queen. Either she is gone due to newbie error and I crushed her, or she up and died. I don't think it was a swarm because my colony certainly has larger numbers than previously. I have a queen coming via mail from a local breeder, five hours from me, and I would like some direction for the requeening process. Last check, Thursday revealed 5 emergency cells on outer frames. I have left those in place as of right now for back up reasons in case my queen dies in transit. How can I tell if I have laying workers? I somewhat understand the process of getting rid of the laying workers, but I'd like some input from experienced beekeepers. Some side notes; Bees are from Georgia, Queen appeared to be doing great, colony is a month old.
All input is greatly appreciated. Thank you!!!
 

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I just posted the procedure in thread "laying worker hive larve in queen cell".. give them time to adjust. put the candy hole up do not puncture the candy. if it is a california cage [no candy] insert a gum drop not a marsmallow, this will slow the release to a couple of days.
 

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Timothy- Your increase in numbers could be from emerging brood. One other question, do you have a second
hive with backup brood or drawn comb?
 

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Dang it. If its a laying worker hive, they will kill that new queen. Its hard without seeing stuff to determine what's
up with things. Most of the time emergency cells are on the face of the frame. Take your caged queen and put it
on top of the frames, usually if they are happy they will fan, if not they will be bity and not so happy. You can save
that queen in a nuc with a frame or two temporarily, if you had extras.
 

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the best way to deal with a laying worker hive, is to start a nuc with a good queen, then do a newspaper combine or to combine the bad hive with another the same way. you are better off finding some more bees some where either to start a nuc or to start over. this may not really the answer you wanted... if you already really have a laying worker hive all the brood will be drones. if you have some worker brood left you do not likely have an out of control situation, that is why it is advised to add a frame of brood every week or 10 days until you have a good queen or good queen cells coming along.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
BEES1.jpg
Here's one photo. I have two others that are giving me some difficulty. I'll let you see this one while I try to figure out the others!
 

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Timothy, reading your previous posts, I doubt you have a laying worker. In my opinion you probably killed the queen doing your hive inspection on the 21st? (5 days before the hive inspection on the 26th?)

It's simply too early to have one, maybe in a month or so that would become a possibility.

Just let the queen cells hatch, leave the hive alone. Check again on July 25th, and you should see eggs by then. The less often you mess with the hive the better the chances they will hatch a new queen. It's easy to freak out about this, but bees have been raising queens much longer than you have been beekeeping. Waiting for queens to start laying will really test your patience....
 

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Timothy - Thanks for that 2nd pic. Those are SS cells on the face of the fr. Looks like one of the cells is
capped, meaning you will have an emerging queen in 8 days or less. If you can spare a frame or two, not
the ones with cells on, I'd make up a small 2nd nuc box and put that new queen with brood in it. Leave
the rest of the hive to make their new queen from those SS cells.
PS: That is not a laying worker hive, they are just making a new queen. Cells look good too.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Yeah, that's a good point. Do you think they could get well established before winter, or will I have to winter them in a nuc? I am thinking that I killed the queen accidentally when I inspected the hive last. It's a 10 frame set up and I've read about people removing one frame to make it a 9 frame set up. Do you think that would help, because I am noticing when I put the frames back in the bees get pinched in between the frames. Is there a way to prevent this from happening? Sorry for all the question, but you've been a great help. Thank you so much!
 

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Yes, I have started nucs in 5fr deep boxes at this time and by late fall they had filled 2 double deep 5fr boxes.
Wrap them for winter with a top entrance and some styro on top and they should make it. As far as 10 framers go,
I use 9frames and two follower boards on the outsides, it makes it easier by removing one follower board and moving a
frame gently over and out to inspect. Helps with ventilation and adds insulation for winter also.
Cut the pieces of a frame in half to use as a follower bd., nail the top and two sides into 1/2 in piece of plywood.
Hang the wooden fr on the outside and fillerup. Good luck
 
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