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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
recently iv been getting more people asking how much to bring a couple of hives to there property, and today i gentleman came to the house from a fairly large golf course and wanted to know about me keeping bee hives on the property for the honey, they grow there own vegetables for there restaurant and want the honey for the same purpose i guess, as he said golf courses are becoming more competitive and wants to add a personal touch.( the golf course is about an hour away )
my thoughts are $30/month a hive, minimum 2 hives, $10.00/per hive, more a month if i supply hive,and i would supply sugar, meds ect. not sure about honey, im thinking i want at least 1/4 of total.
and i must somehow cover myself on liability, im guessing a written contract.
its hard to price a service when theres not much to compare it to.
 

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A better idea would be to sell them some hives, then charge an hourly rate plus expenses for your beekeeping services.
 

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I agree. That is what I do here. if they want full time hives but not to manage, they buy all the equipment, etc supplies, whatever is needed then I charge for maintaining/inspecting, etc...

To me "renting" a hive is a short term thing like placing a hive for pollination at a farm or garden for a month.

Big Bear
 

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Golf courses are notorious about using tons of toxic chemicals. I would not put my hives on a golf course plain and simple.

You could offer to manage hives the golf course owned. I would not be willing to work for a percentage, as I suspect pesticide kills would ruin any hopes of a crop. If you manage, make sure the golf course is aware that they are liable for all colony losses.

If it were me, I'd offer to produce honey elsewhere, and have them market my local honey at the golf course.
 

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Golf courses are notorious about using tons of toxic chemicals. I would not put my hives on a golf course plain and simple.

You could offer to manage hives the golf course owned. I would not be willing to work for a percentage, as I suspect pesticide kills would ruin any hopes of a crop. If you manage, make sure the golf course is aware that they are liable for all colony losses.

If it were me, I'd offer to produce honey elsewhere, and have them market my local honey at the golf course.
Being a golf course superintendent I can say honey bees thrive quite well on my property. We have a fair amout of natrualized areas that the bees just love. There are many annual and perennial plants.

There is a stigma about golf courses being toxic waste dumps and it is far form the truth. We in the industry work very hard on reducing chemical inputs creating a more biological diverse environment. We demand that of ourselves. We are reducing synthetic fertilzers and feeding the soil with composted organic nutrition sources. A great benefit of that is increased plant health. Increased plant health meanes lower chemical inputs.

The EPA has worked very hard to create and green course as "green" as possible. Fact is, the 1970's were about as bad as it got. Heavy metal fungicides and organophosphate insecticides were standard. All of the heavy metal fungicides and most of the organophoshate insecticides are gone.

All chemicals that are applied are done so early in the morning and never to foraging bee plants. There is a few hundred foot buffer at my place between application and naturalized forage area. Honey bees are not attraced to 1/8 bentgrass.......only people are....correction the deer in the fall like fighting on them like some sort of boxing ring....all over a female!

Fact of the matter is visit any working farm and see how offensive to the enrivorment they are. We need farm to feed people so the regulations are about a 1/10th as tight as a recreational facility.

I currently have 6 hives and 3 will be split in the spring.....and I am placing them on my golf course with the permission of the membership.

Remember............if you like eating apples.....they get sprayed about twice a month with fungicide/insecticide. Ever wonder why in the last hundred years we have 95% less farms and 60% more people and we have enough food?

I love to aswer any question people have so if you have any, ask away.
 

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I know nothing about golf courses. I do find it interesting that our governmental regulations regarding organic honey standards REQUIRE bee yards to be a minimum of two miles from any golf course. The presumption seems to be the chemical applications.

Maybe our government needs to be enlightened. Good luck on that one!

But considering "renting" hives, consider your time to look after such a small number of hives and access issues. Consider a nice place to set up the hives away from the public, especially the curious people who may freak out because they're allergic to bee stings. These days, honeybees bring out a natural paranoia that requires lots of public relations work. Consider what may happen when these colonies swarm and fill the air with bees. Consider the trash cans and dumpsters with those little dribbles of beer and soda pop when the nectar dearth sinks in.

I think if I had this opportunity, and if I really wanted to do it, I'd set up the bee yard about 100 yards from the golf course. The garden would get pollinated and the likelihood of anyone getting stung is minimized.

But the more I think about it, I'd pass.

Grant
Jackson, MO
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
according to the guy i spoke with he said it was a total of about 150 acres of land and the driving range and golf course were only part of it and the rest was wild, on there web site they advertise deer and other game, he said that there are alot of chestnut trees, i would not put them close to the course, i cant imagine beer, golf cart, golf clubs and balls would mix with bees. im not sure but i dont think they want to buy,they just want it to happen.
ill know a little better when i talk to one of the bosses.
 

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well, maybe consider a trade
your hives, they offer to plant known bee plants in the "wild" area to feed the bees.

you get a year round bee yard, they get pollination of their plants.

that's a deal I would think about.

Big Bear
 

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I know nothing about golf courses. I do find it interesting that our governmental regulations regarding organic honey standards REQUIRE bee yards to be a minimum of two miles from any golf course. The presumption seems to be the chemical applications.

Maybe our government needs to be enlightened. Good luck on that one!

Grant
Jackson, MO
Where does one find these government regulations of which you write? I'd like to learn more about organic honey standards.
 
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