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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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I assume you are talking about BEESWAX. $1 per ounce is about right in my area. I recently sold 3 1# blocks of cleaned and filtered wax for $15 each. If you are asking about lard, can't help. :p
 

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Perhaps you have a lot and its unrealistic, but you can always charge significantly more per oz. of beeswax in a finished product like candles, soap, or chapstick. Easy to make and everyone loves them!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I assume you are talking about BEESWAX. $1 per ounce is about right in my area. I recently sold 3 1# blocks of cleaned and filtered wax for $15 each. If you are asking about lard, can't help. :p
Sorry, yes I’m talking about bees, but I’m rendering for a beekeeper. I wanted to start rendering for the local beekeeper that don’t feel like doing it do I can use the wax to make candles. That seems high , also do you have any suggestions on how to get the word out that I’m rendering beeswax. I
for the wax or for the service?

GG
For the service. I was excited when I started this weekend to do this. Now I’m exhausted from working all day then coming home and dealing with this. I’m using two crockpots and the process is taking forever. Any suggestions on how to do this faster? I started with three 5 gallon buckets I still have one left. I’m getting discouraged. Any tips?
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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There are many YT videos on rendering beeswax. I could not even imagine using a crockpot. For small quantities I use a six quart stock pot and plenty of water. For larger quantities, use a bigger pot. You need to strain, and cool several times to get the cleanest product. The $1 per ounce was you selling your wax, the rendering service would be about half of that, less if the quantity was large. And, you would need to get it really clean, no brown specks. Maybe some of the commercial guys could help with tips.
 

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scope and scale is going to matter here... ie how many pounds per year are you going to process?
as a primer

my thoughts (danger Will Robinson)
a 55 gallon open top steel drum with a propane burner (or better yet a water tank immersion heater) might be your ticket. Take a burlap sack (not synthetic) fill with cappings and wire shut, put a few big rocks on top and fill with water a good way above the level of the sack.

at my scale (I try to make as little honey as possible) I have a pot and lid big enough to take a 1 gal milk jug with a bit of its top cut off sitting on a hot plate that I run as a double boiler.. little water in the jug, pack with wax., cover, keep adding till its full.
pull the jug, take the water from the pot and poor in to a 5 gal bucket as thermal ballast, put a paint strainer, screen over the bucket and poor the wax/water threw. Take a pair of oversized dishwashing gloves (wax proof) and put them over a pair of thick cotton gloves (insulation) and twist/squeeze the wax out of the slumgum.
let sit over night and then flip the bucket over on the lawn or street to drain away. Scrape the fines off the bottom off the sold "puck" of wax and repeat

When you have enuff scraped pucks to fil a milk jug repeat(with a clean jug ) an pour threw a t shirt, scrape the bottom and then that wax is you product

sound like min wage sweatshop job work.. your right... unless you get the volume up

I wanted to start rendering for the local beekeeper that don’t feel like doing it do I can use the wax to make candles.
I am a bit lost here.. are you wanting to take what you see as cast off byproduct and use it for your own use and sale
or prosses it for a fee to the people who had not need of in the 1st place and return it to you

Ie biodiesel was a great thing when waist grease was free and it was seen as recycling but with demand came competition.. it became a biding war, and it became an asset, not trash in the eyes of the beholder

if the "the local beekeeper that don’t feel like doing it" ain't doing it... you better be a big fish if there ain't enuff for them to eat doing it
 

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scope and scale is going to matter here... ie how many pounds per year are you going to process?
as a primer

my thoughts (danger Will Robinson)
a 55 gallon open top steel drum with a propane burner (or better yet a water tank immersion heater) might be your ticket. Take a burlap sack (not synthetic) fill with cappings and wire shut, put a few big rocks on top and fill with water a good way above the level of the sack.

at my scale (I try to make as little honey as possible) I have a pot and lid big enough to take a 1 gal milk jug with a bit of its top cut off sitting on a hot plate that I run as a double boiler.. little water in the jug, pack with wax., cover, keep adding till its full.
pull the jug, take the water from the pot and poor in to a 5 gal bucket as thermal ballast, put a paint strainer, screen over the bucket and poor the wax/water threw. Take a pair of oversized dishwashing gloves (wax proof) and put them over a pair of thick cotton gloves (insulation) and twist/squeeze the wax out of the slumgum.
let sit over night and then flip the bucket over on the lawn or street to drain away. Scrape the fines off the bottom off the sold "puck" of wax and repeat

When you have enuff scraped pucks to fil a milk jug repeat(with a clean jug ) an pour threw a t shirt, scrape the bottom and then that wax is you product

sound like min wage sweatshop job.. your right... unless you get the volume up

I wanted to start rendering for the local beekeeper that don’t feel like doing it do I can use the wax to make candles.
bit lost here.. are you wanting to take what you see as cast off byproduct and use it for your own use and sale
or prosses it for a fee to the people who had not need of it in the 1st place
 

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Charlie gave me some buckets of cappings that I solar melted. The value of the wax and cooked honey came to less than the value of my labor. If I figured the wax worth $6 a pound, and the cooked honey at $1.50 a pound, and my labor at $50 an hour, it came to a $31 loss.
Another bucket produced $42 product minus my labor and all other costs. I would never buy cappings to make money. You might be better working your day job and buying the wax.


3
I just started rendering and I don’t know what to charge. Help!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
There are many YT videos on rendering beeswax. I could not even imagine using a crockpot. For small quantities I use a six quart stock pot and plenty of water. For larger quantities, use a bigger pot. You need to strain, and cool several times to get the cleanest product. The $1 per ounce was you selling your wax, the rendering service would be about half of that, less if the quantity was large. And, you would need to get it really clean, no brown specks. Maybe some of the commercial guys could help with tips.
Thank you for the advice.
 

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ok so you are doing the service.

first do you want the money or do you want the wax.

if the money figure what the time takes and what you need for compensation and offer based on that.
if the wax then do a share deal, like 50-50

I do mine while painting or building frames, as the "wait" is boring.

I installed an old stove in the shop, converted the welder plug to a stove plug.
Use a stock pot 6 quart on the burner, add 3 quarts of water and put in cappings a coffee can at a time till mostly full.
boil, cool, and save the pucks as mentioned above, in a 5 gal pail. need to filter some how and make into bricks or something based on the demand for the product you are attempting to fill.

certainly not a get rich quick scheme. do it to help others or get good clean wax.

for me in your shoes, I would bartend and buy the wax online, it would be more entertaining.
But hey if you enjoy it then keep going, agree bigger pot more heat will go faster.

happy melting. do pay attention the wax and heat is a fire hazard as you may have surmised.

GG
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks that helps. I’m doing it for the wax. At first I thought I’d like to do it as a business as well as making candles, but I have a day job so I don’t have time or the kitchen space right now. Appreciate your advice!
 
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