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So the Lord blessed me with this colony I discovered in a tree; it’s about 30 feet up. The tree is not coming down. Should I let them try in overwinter? Or should I do a trap out and get them out now? I caught a swarm about 40 yards on the top of my shed with the swarm trap from this location in May. It may have been a swarm from this colony? I don’t know as it’s on the backside of the tree where we don’t usually look and it could’ve been there for a while.

Last season I would put wet super frames out to get cleaned up and they would get hammered pretty quickly. I thought that was from another beekeeper who’s about a quarter to a half mile away. But maybe they were from this tree?

Twig Trunk Sky Plant Terrestrial plant
 

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I prefer to start colonies when they have a better chance of surviving. Unless this is a lumber removal, you know where this tree is located and can remove this colony at your leisure. Mark this tree and go back in April or when your swarm season starts. It's nice to have some survivor genetics near your colonies. If under a time crunch, then do what you have to do. Good luck!
 

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1. Too late in the season to do it. Even if trap outs work (tricky) they take weeks or months and definitely too late in the season.

2. What a great learning opportunity. Bees evolved to live in tree hollows. I would leave them as a reference sample to compare vs your colonies. Allowed to propolise, build comb how they wish, not continually diverted from hygiene practices, and brood breaks when they want (supersedure, no feeding) and high up in a thick walled cavity they may last years. The ones round here do.

Sometimes bees aren't just about money.
 

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Exactly - why?
What is this urgent urge to remove/trap out bees from a tree?
Not to mention the effort involved?
:)

If these are just commercial bees in a tree - they are not worth the effort/tree removal (will most likely die off - not much lost).
If these are true feral bees - catching their swarms is easy enough - while maintaining the long-term feral swarm source makes all kinds of sense.

Just leave them.
 

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The European Honey Bee is not a native species to North America.
There are no feral honey bees in the US they are all commercial in origin.
A bee colony does not know if it feral or managed (commercial), they merely react genetically to the environment they are in.
 

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The European Honey Bee is not a native species to North America.
There are no feral honey bees in the US they are all commercial in origin.
A bee colony does not know if it feral or managed (commercial), they merely react genetically to the environment they are in.
Incorrect.
Look up the very definition of "feral".

Then compare that to the term - "wild".
 
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