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Hello,

I have had a rough week and being a new keeper I am at a loss. I have had two swarms both originating from the same hive. each of the 2 swarms were put in to separate hives (or makeshift ones a medium super and a portable nuc box until my two deeps arrive) SO today in order to avoid anymore of these i once again looked at the original hive and removed all the swarm cells (again) and noticed that I dont have that many bees anymore (thanks to the two swarms) what i am wondering is if there us a way that I can reincorporate these swarms back into the original hive. Any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks
Mitch
 

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Sure you can do it, but you will have to wait. I would try to maximize the amount of brood and honey from all "hives" so let them do their thing and in the Fall, unite the weak one that you think might not be able to go through the winter well, using the newspaper method. Since they are swarms, they have that "energy" that goes with a swarm, so they might surprise you. If you unite them now, it will probably fail and you will also lose that swarming "energy" that could work in your favor. I always consider a hive that I've missed and they have inevitably made preparations to swarm, as a dozen lemons that have to be made into lemonade. It's an opportunity, esp. in May. OMTCW
 

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Did you leave any queen cells in the original hive or did you find a queen before destroying the cells? There may not be a queen in the original hive now, no eggs or larva young enough to grow a queen, so the hive may end up queenless. If that happens you may need use one of the swarms to do a newspaper combine to save the original hive. The old queen usually leaves with the first swarm.
 
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