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Hi all,

So I've been trying to think about winter coming and am trying to figure out how much honey the bees need. One source I read said basically a deep full of capped honey which comes out to about 80-90 lbs. I'm in washington and its pretty temperate here. Any feedback on if that's right? Last week my strongest hive seemed about there. They had 4 frames fully capped and another few frames closer to the middle where the brood nest is mostly capped. When I checked again today it looks like the queen is slowing down laying. The top deep that used to have all that brood is now mostly empty cells. And they look to be working hard downstairs now. These are first year hives. My weaker hive has no honey in the top deep, with some brood. And some capped honey around the edges of the brood nest in the lower deep. I've started feeding this hive 2:1. Should I be thinking about feeding the other hive as well?
 

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Sugar is cheap. Early while the bees have time to cure the syrup, feed until your double deep or triple medium colonies weigh 125-140 and be done with it. Put some mountain camp sugar on if you are a belt and suspenders type like me. It will absorb moisture and be emergency feed. I have inner covers cut from sheets of half inch sound board. Change them out and dry them as they become moisture saturated. This will work unless you fail to kill your varroa mites. Then nothing works.
 

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If winter is longer/colder than you expect or spring is cold and long, think how sad you will be in the spring to find the colony dead with absolutely NO food left in the hive. Better to have more than not. Like Vance said, Sugar is cheap, certainly cheaper than buying in more bees.
 
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