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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there a specific kind of refractometer that needs to be used for honey. On a FB market search I found coolant and saline refractometer for a lot cheaper than mann lake. Is there a difference? Any particular thing I should look for or stay away from?
 

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Is there a specific kind of refractometer that needs to be used for honey. On a FB market search I found coolant and saline refractometer for a lot cheaper than mann lake. Is there a difference? Any particular thing I should look for or stay away from?
It has to be in the right range area and for the product being tested. Here is an ebay link to one that is correct. I probably have the identical but bought from a bee supplier in a hurry and paid more than twice the price.

 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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That is the same one as I bought from Brushy Mountain for about $75. Works well for what we do, but the instructions for calibrating it stink. Better to use EVO and not the fluid they provide.
 
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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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There can be some variations in olive oil.I recommend food grade glycerine.
I oz will last a lifetime.
Whatever I got with mine wouldn't even scale. Solid blue.
 
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Sorry for the stupid question, but why would a beekeeper need a refractometer? What exactly can this be measured and what can be influenced in the future?
 

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Wild bees
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Sorry for the stupid question, but why would a beekeeper need a refractometer? What exactly can this be measured and what can be influenced in the future?
Based on my experience...

Some beekeepers take honey by the super, instead of by the frame. When you take honey by the frame, you can examine the frame to make sure that the majority of cells are capped. The honey in those capped cells is "ripe" and at a moisture level that is "proper". That honey will not spoil, although it can crystalize.

When you take honey by the super, you are likely to get frames where the majority of the cells are not capped. The honey in uncapped cells is not "ripe" and will have a high moisture level. The question then, is "What is the moisture level in the extracted honey?" Is it "proper" or at a high enough level that it could ferment? That's what you'd use a refractometer to answer.
 

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I got one because I was curious what the moisture content of my honey was because it was really thick. If you are concerned about honey fermentation a refractometer can tell you are if you are in a danger zone or not for fermentation
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Sorry for the stupid question, but why would a beekeeper need a refractometer? What exactly can this be measured and what can be influenced in the future?
The reason that I'm wanting one is for fermentation. I keep honey till next season just to make sure I've got enough for friends and family but don't want it fermenting on me.
 
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